Entering Metairie Cemetery 1930s

Entering Metairie Cemetery 1930s

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Entering Metairie Cemetery before the expressway, 1930s. Entering Metairie Cemetery Franck Studios photo of Metairie Cemetery, from the 1930s. The perspective is from the Metairie Road side. The original entrance to the cemetery stands just behind the photographer. The New Canal flowed past Metairie Cemetery at this time. Charles T. Howard acquired the land for the cemetery in 1871. The...
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Canal Line Arch Roofs 1960 #StreetcarSaturday

Canal Line Arch Roofs 1960 #StreetcarSaturday

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NOPSI 934 and 935 were Canal Line Arch roofs in the 1960s. Canal Line Arch Roofs 900-series streetcars operating as Canal Line arch roofs, 17-February-1960. I can't make out the ads on either streetcar; if you can, let me know! NOPSI 934 and 935 sit at the Cemeteries Terminal. Tennessee Williams mentions the "cemeteries" in "A Streetcar Named Desire." While...
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Metairie Cemetery 1905ish

Metairie Cemetery 1905ish

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Metairie Cemetery at the turn of the 20th Century. Metairie Cemetery Detroit Publishing Company postcard of Metairie Cemetery, circa 1905. The state granted the Metairie Cemetery Association a charter in 1872. So, at the time of this photo, the cemetery was about thirty years old. The cemetery sits on the Metairie Ridge, next to Bayou Metairie. The Metairie Race Course,...
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Hebrew Rest Cemetery Gentilly 1961

Hebrew Rest Cemetery Gentilly 1961

Hebrew Rest Cemetery, just off of Elysian Fields Avenue and Gentilly Boulevard.

hebrew rest cemetery

Hebrew Rest Cemetery

This aerial shot of Gentilly captures both sections of Hebrew Rest Cemetery. Latter and Blum commissioned this aerial set. The set documents the development of shopping centers running from Frenchmen Street to Elysian Fields Avenue in 1961. Hebrew Rest Cemetery predates those shopping centers by 100 years.

Jewish Cemeteries

Jewish congregations formed in New Orleans in the 1820s. By the 1840s, those congregations built cemeteries. They started at the end of Canal Street. As the city grew, more cemeteries were needed. Additionally, diseases like Yellow Fever struck New Orleans. In 1860, the city’s oldest congregation, Shangari Chasset, acquired land n Gentilly for a cemetery.

Cemetery Management

Reform Jews in New Orleans formed Congregation Temple Sinai in 1870. Shangari Chasset turned over all of their cemetery properties to Temple Sinai two years later.

The congregation re-organized the Gentilly cemetery in 1872. They formed a separate corporation, the Hebrew Rest Cemetery Association. This separated the cemetery from a single congregation. In 1892, the Association purchased the land in Gentilly. So, they built Hebrew Rest #2. They constructed a third expansion in 1935.

Above ground

Jewish tradition calls for in-ground burials. While we think of New Orleans cemeteries and their above-ground tombs, the city’s Jews weren’t the only ones who dug graves. So, a walk through St. Patrick Cemetery No 1, on Canal Street, reveals a number of in-ground graves. These graves are actually “copings.” Rather than simply a hole in the ground, a concrete frame surrounds a coping. Dirt fills the frame. So, the coping is an in-ground burial, but raised by a foot or two. This addresses concerns that the city’s high water table might push a coffin out of the ground.

Hebrew Rest sits on the Gentilly Ridge, one of the highest points in New Orleans.

 

Greenwood Cemetery 1930s

Greenwood Cemetery 1930s

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Greenwood Cemetery 1930s via a Franck Studios photo. Greenwood Cemetery 1930s The Fireman's Charitable and Benevolent Association (FCBA) incorporated in 1834. Its purpose was initially as a burial society. Firefighting was a volunteer job in the 19th Century. If a firefighter lost his life on the job, there were no survivor benefits. The family was left having to bury their...
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St. Louis Cemetery Stereograph

St. Louis Cemetery Stereograph

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St. Louis Cemetery stereograph Grant Rowles, an amateur photographer and collector, amassed this impressive collection of 389 stereograph photographs. This collection of vintage albumen prints of New Orleans and Louisiana date from mid 1860s to the early 20th century from 1880. St. Louis Cemetery stereograph Photo of St. Louis Cemetery No. 1, located on Basin Street in Faubourg Treme. The...
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