Chalmette Monument 1930s #battleofneworleans

Chalmette Monument 1930s #battleofneworleans

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Chalmette Monument 1930s is a photo from a WPA-sponsored arts program. Chalmette Monument 1930s Photo of the monument at Chalmette National Battlefield commemorating the Battle of New Orleans, on 8-January-1815. The obelisk, 100 feet in height, looks over the battlefield, which is one of the five sites of the Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve. Building the Obelisk The...
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The Hunters of Kentucky

The Hunters of Kentucky

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The Hunters of Kentucky told a very one-sided story of the Battle of New Orleans The Hunters of Kentucky On the 9th of January in the year 1815, about one-quarter of the American forces at Chalmette originated from Kentucky. Major General Andrew Jackson led skirmishes and full-blown battles across the Gulf Coast during the War of 1812. While he enjoyed...
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Ballou Battle of New Orleans 1855 Drawing

Ballou Battle of New Orleans 1855 Drawing

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Ballou Battle of New Orleans is a mid-19th Century illustration of the 1815 battle Ballou Battle From Ballou's Pictorial Drawing Room Companion comes this engraving of the Battle of New Orleans. While the battle happened on January 9, 1815, this drawing is likely from the mid-19th Century. Gleason's and Ballou's This illustrated magazine began as "Gleason's Pictorial Drawing Room Companion"...
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Comus 1968 parade. Theme: History of New Orleans

Comus 1968 parade. Theme: History of New Orleans

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Comus 1968 presented "The History of New Orleans" as their theme. Comus 1968 The Mystick Krewe of Comus presented quality parades with thoughtful themes. Comus 1968 offered "The History of New Orleans." Naturally the Battle of New Orleans in 1815 earned its own float. The Krewe Comus first paraded in 1857. So, Comus 1968 rolled through Uptown New Orleans over...
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BNO Positions 23-Dec-1814

BNO Positions 23-Dec-1814

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BNO Positions 23-Dec-1814 to 8-Jan-1815 BNO Positions Much of the writing on the Battle of New Orleans focuses on the main conflict on 9-January-1815. How the combatants came together in Chalmette is a larger story. 23-December-1814 to 18-January-1815 This map, "Sketch of the Position of the British and American Forces during the Operations against New Orleans," lays out the overall...
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NOLA History Guy Podcast 8-June-2019 – Industrial Canal and USCT

NOLA History Guy Podcast 8-June-2019 – Industrial Canal and USCT

Two short-form pieces this week on NOLA History Guy Podcast 8-June-2019

NOLA History Guy Podcast 8-June-2019

Chalmette National Cemetery (NPS photo)

NOLA History Guy Podcast 8-June-2019

We hope you enjoyed our conversations with Derby Gisclair over the last two weeks. Back to short-form this week, with our pick from Today in New Orleans History and some thoughts on Chalmette National Cemetery.

The Industrial Canal

Our pick from NewOrleansPast dot com this week is 6-June-1918. That’s when construction of the Industrial Canal began.As a refresher, there were three connections that ran from the city to the lake over time:

  • The Carondelet Canal, 1795, which ran from just above the French Quarter, out to what is now Mid-City, and the start of Bayou St. John. This canal fixed the “Old Portage” problem.
  • The Pontchartrain Railroad, which ran from Port Milneburg to Faubourg Marigny. The railroad was a straight run, along what eventually became Elysian Fields Avenue. Heavier ships would come into Lake Pontchartrain from the Gulf of Mexico and would dock at the pier at Milneburg. The railroad carried goods and people from the pier to the station at the river.
  • The New Basin Canal. Completed in 1838, the New Canal connected the “American Sector” to the lake. The canal began at S. Rampart Street. It ran out to Lake Pontchartrain  at West End. A small portion of the canal remains at West End.

So, these three connected the city up to the start of the 20th Century. By 1910, though, the canals lacked the depth to service larger ships. In 1914, the state authorized the Port of New Orleans to build a new canal. The canal began in the Ninth Ward, just past Poland Avenue. It runs straight from there, out to the lake.

Chalmette National Cemetery

NOLA History Guy Podcast 8-June-2019

Unveiling of the USCT Memorial in Cape Girardeau MO

I saw an article about a monument to United States Colored Troops (USCT) in Cape Girardeau, Missouri. When I shared that article on NOLA History Guy’s Facebook page, I mentioned that we should have such a USCT monument, probably out at Chalmette National Cemetery. Thousands of USCT soldiers rest in that cemetery. I got some racist feedback on this, from folks who clearly were unaware of the cemetery’s origins. Here’s a quick run-down.