Spanish Map 1798 – Copied/translated in 1875

Spanish Map 1798 – Copied/translated in 1875

Spanish Map 1798 is a copy image created in 1875.

spanish map 1798

“Plan of the City of New Orleans and adjacent plantations,” 1798. (Public domain image via LOC. Click image for higher resolutions)

Spanish Map 1798

My friend Derby Gisclair posts old New Orleans images that catch his eye daily on social media. I love this, because the more of us that promote the city’s history, the more people come around to the subject. And the more books we sell! Derby posted this map yesterday. The wording on the image caught my eye, so I gave it a deep dive.

Plan of the city

The title of the map:

Plan of the City of New Orleans and adjacent plantations.

Compiled in accordance with an Ordinance of the Illustrations Ministry and Royal Charter, 24 December, 1798

Signed: Carlos Trudeau

But this is not the original! It is a copy. The copy illustrator made this note:

COPY and TRANSLATION

From the Original Spanish Plan dated 1798,

showing the

City of New Orleans

Its Fortifications and Environs

April 1875

A note at the bottom says, “Drawn by Alex’ DeBrunner N.O.”

Notes on Plantations

spanish map 1798

Detail of Trudeau’s map, showing the French Quarter.

The Spanish Map 1798 offers detailed notes on the various property holdings around the city. While the detail of what is now the French Quarter is accurate, the detail outside the Quarter enhances its usefulness. The map shows the “first cemetery,” inside the bounds of the Quarter, as well as St. Louis Cemetery No. 1, on Basin Street. The cemetery sits just west of the turning basin of the Caroldelet Canal. The linear canal stands in stark contrast to Bayou St. John and other waterways in the area.

The map presents what is now St. Louis Cathedral as the “parish church.” While this may be a translation issue, it’s possible that Don Carlos named it that on his original. The city re-built the church after the fire of 1788. It became a cathedral in 1793, when Louisiana became a separate diocese.

Gravier’s holdings

spanish map 1798

Note explaining the land holdings of John Gravier.

Just outside the French Quarter

Land of John Gravier, part of the plantation of the Jesuits, confiscated through his very christian Majesty ; 15 arpents front on the Mississippi River.

The Society of Jesus received a land grant from the King of France, operating a plantation just upriver. The Spanish suppressed the Jesuits in Spain in its colonies in 1763. John Gravier received the Jesuit land. By 1798, the Spanish planned to fully develop what is now the Central Business District.

The Spanish Map 1798 confuses royal titles. While the Spanish controlled colony in 1798, the map references the French king’s title. The king of France used the title, “His Most Christian Majesty.” The king of Spain, “His Most Catholic Majesty,” and the king of Great Britain, “His Most Brittanic Majesty.” Debrunner likely translated the title wrong, since the reference is to the king of Spain.

Don Carlos Trudeau created the Spanish Map 1798

Trudeau was Surveyor General of Spanish Louisiana. While the dominant language of Colonial New Orleans was French, Spanish records list him as Don Carlos Trudeau. Trudeau surveyed and designed what is now Lafayette Square, in Faubourg Ste. Marie. This Spanish Map 1798 fits the pattern of extensive documentation by the government of the Viceroyalty of New Spain.

Trudeau was born in New Orleans, in 1743. France owned and governed New Orleans at the time. He became Surveyor General in the 1780s (the Spanish assumed control of New Orleans in 1763). Trudeau held the post until 1805. He resigned after the Americans took over New Orleans. So, Charles returned to public service a few years later, serving as Acting Mayor for six months in 1812, and on the City Council.

“dit Laveau”

Trudeau’s family followed a French naming tradition of the time honoring distinguished women. Charles received the honorific, “dit Laveau,” recognizing his paternal great-grandmother, Marie Catherine de Lavaux, of Montreal. Trudeau married Charlotte Perrault. So, the couple had four daughters. Additionally, Trudeau engaged in a relationship with Marguerite Darcantel, a gen de couleur libre. He had a daughter with Darcantel, Marie Laveau.

 

 

 

Support NOLA History Guy on Patreon

Support NOLA History Guy on Patreon

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support nola history guy

Plan of New Orleans, 1722

Support NOLA History Guy

I’m adding history content to my Patreon stream. I’ve thought about how to offer “premium” content here. A couple of people suggested ideas. Those ideas weren’t specific to Patreon, but you know how the process goes. Someone says something, you go, “hmmm…”, then an idea gels. That’s this idea.

Patreon

Put simply, Patreon is a platform for hosting paid content. Creatives post content. Readers/viewers subscribe to the creative’s page. Pricing begins at a dollar a month. Patreon creatives set the value of their content. So, subscribers choose a level that works for them.

Edward Branley on Patreon

I planned to use Patreon as a platform for the writing. I regularly write short stories. While most of those stories end up in some editor’s slush pile. I decided to drop them on Patreon. Therefore, a $1 subscription isn’t all that bad a deal!

In addition to short stories, I’ll be adding future novels as they develop. For example, the third Dragon’s novel, tentatively titled Dragon’s Defiance, will be around 55K words in 11 chapters. So, the novel will come out on Patreon by chapter, starting in December. I’ll post each chapter in 2-3 segments over a month. Why December? That gives me time to let Lady Duchess of the Red Pen go over it. We have a routine, and now Patreon will slide into that.

The YA novels sell for $13 apiece. Eleven chapters at a dollar a month subscription isn’t a bad deal! It’s possible the Patreon content may deviate slightly from the published work, of course. Things evolve as a story develops. So, subscribers who stick with the process will have the chance to get the finished epub as well.

NOLA History Guy on Patreon

This is the new stuff. Starting today, the Patreon stream includes history content. This month’s content is the hi-res (6697×5000 pixels) version of the 1722 map at the top of this page. Can you find this online? Yes, can you get it for free? Yes. Will you get a hi-res map or image each month directly from NOLA History Guy? Nope.

I’m also working on detailed content for the site. That content will be offered first on Patreon. October’s Patreon article will be on Alejandro O’Reilly, the second Spanish governor of Louisiana. The blog features short articles, streetcars, shopping, personalities. People like a quick dose of history. Over time, those short articles add up to a longer feature. Patreon subscribers will get those articles first.

How it works

  1. Keep reading NOLA History Guy! – make suggestions for features and new content
  2. Subscribe to Edward Branley’s Patreon Page
  3. Enjoy being a patron!

Thanks!

 

St. Louis Cathedral, 1819

St. Louis Cathedral, 1819

St. Louis Cathedral, 1819

st. louis cathedral, 1819

St. Louis Cathedral, 1819. Drawing by Benjamin Latrobe (public domain image via THNOC)

St. Louis Cathedral, 1819

I’m working on a scene that’s a bit of a flashback to 1820 New Orleans, for my next novel. As usual, I looked around for some contemporary illustrations of the Quarter, and found two interesting drawings of the St. Louis Cathedral.

The first (top) is a drawing by architect Benjamin Latrobe. This is the 1794 construction. The original parish church burned in the fire of 1794. Andres Almonaster y Rojas, notary for the Spanish Colonial government (and father of the Baroness Pontalba), financed the construction of the church. With the appointment of the first Bishop of Louisiana in 1792, this was the first cathedral on the site.

Unknown Illustrator, 1819

St. Louis Cathedral 1819

Scene showing the Cabildo, St. Louis Cathedral, and the Presbytere, before 1820. (Public domain image courtesy THNOC)

The illustrator of this second drawing is unknown, but it’s from the same period. While Latrobe’s drawing has the precision of an architect, this sketch captures the church’s surroundings. The Cabildo is on the left. Pirate’s Alley is between the Cabildo and the St Louis Cathedral, 1819. That name for the alley wouldn’t come into common use for decades. Therefore, the cathedral is center, then another alley (to later become Pere Antoine Alley). Trees obscure the Presbytere on the right.

Place d’Armes

The square in front of cathedral was not yet Jackson Square. It was the parade ground, the Place d’Armes, or Plaza das Armas, in Spanish. So, the Cabildo was the seat of the Spanish Colonial government. When the Americans took ownership of Louisiana in 1803, the building remained the seat of government. W.C.C. Claiborne kept his office as Territorial Governor. He also stayed there as governor of the State of Louisiana.

1830s Expansion

The cathedral chapter and the diocese decided the church needed to be more prominent. So, it was expanded in the 1830s. Unfortunately, the extensions to the towers put too much pressure on the structure. By late 1840s, the building was in danger of collapse. The diocese re-built the cathedral into the building we know today.

 

Krauss – The New Orleans Value Store

by Edward J. Branley

For almost one hundred years, generations of New Orleans shoppers flocked to Krauss. The Canal Street store was hailed for its vast merchandise selection and quality customer service. In its early days, it sold lace and fabric to the ladies of the notorious red-light district of Storyville. The store’s renowned lunch counter, Eddie’s at Krauss, served Eddie Baquet’s authentic New Orleans cuisine to customers and celebrities such as Julia Child. Although the beloved store finally closed its doors in 1997, Krauss is still fondly remembered as a retail haven. With vintage photographs, interviews with store insiders and a wealth of research, historian Edward J. Branley brings the story of New Orleans’ Creole department store back to life.

The Atlantic Slave Trade – a TedEd video

The Atlantic Slave Trade – a TedEd video

The Atlantic Slave Trade

Understanding the Atlantic Slave Trade

A Facebook friend shared this TedEd video this morning. It’s clarity and frankness impressed me. This video (about five minutes long) is a great resource for classroom teachers and homeschoolers alike. If you teach History in middle school or above, add this to your lessons. This is the perfect addition to inadequate textbooks.

The Atlantic Slave Trade brought enslaved Africans to North America. One of the things folks excusing human trafficking say is, “Africans sold their own into slavery.” Yes, this is true. So, this presentation explains European involvement in the trade. African rulers sold their enemies from rival areas and tribes to the Europeans. In addition rulers profited from enslavement. It was an easy solution for refugees and prisoners of war.

New Orleans and Human Trafficking

New Orleans became a major port of entry for enslaved Africans. It wasn’t a direct part of the Atlantic Slave Trade, though. Africans died in large numbers in transit. Therefore, traffickers ran from West Africa to North America as quickly as possible. They unloaded the survivors of the passages in cities on the Atlantic coast. Additionally, they traveled to the Caribbean, Saint-Domingue or Havana. New Orleans connected the Islands to the US. As the plantation economy grew in the Deep South, slave owners in the islands moved their property to the mainland. Even though the British outlawed the slave trade in 1807, the practice continued for decades. The port of New Orleans moved many of the enslaved into the country.

Museums and Memorials

atlantic slave trade

USS Constellation, anchored in Baltimore’s Inner Harbor (courtesy Flickr user sherseydc)

This video presents the background for the concept of a “slave ship museum.” In Baltimore, the USS Constellation museum recognizes the ship’s past as a slaver. So, the impact of human trafficking isn’t the main focus. Is New Orleans the right place for such a museum? Check out the video and share your thoughts.