Bagur Southern Souvenier Postcard

Bagur Southern Souvenier Postcard

The Bagur Southern Souvenir Company produced postcards of New Orleans.

bagur southern

Bagur Southern Souvenir

“Greetings from New Orleans” postcard, published by the Dexter Press company, of Pearl River, NY. Bagur Southern Souvenir Company sold a wide range of products. They hold the rights to the “Aunt Sally” logo for “Creole Pralines.”

Curt Teich created this style of postcard. His company produced hundreds of “Greetings postcards.”

Greetings from New Orleans

Curt Teich, a German, immigrated to the United States in 1895. He opened a print shop in 1899. Teich produced linen postcards. Beginning in 1931, Teich produced a line of color postcards saying, “Greetings From…” He published postcards featuring hundreds of locations across the United States.

Businesses selling souvenirs snapped up Teich’s postcards. Travelers purchased the postcards to document family trips. The postcards continued in popularity until the Interstate Highway System dominated auto travel in the 1950s. Interstate highways bypassed the small towns and shops that sold Teich’s Cards. Stops consisted of gas stations and restaurants immediately off of the highway, rather than passing through towns.

Curt Teich passed away in 1974. He was 96. The family donated their collection of postcards to the Lake County Discovery Museum in Libertyville, Illinois. The museum transferred the collection to the Newberry Library in Chicago. The collection at The Newberry consists of over 500,000 unique postcard designs. This postcard came to the Newberry from the Bagur shop in the French Market.

Pralines and Souvenirs

The Bagur family began their candy business in the 1910s. They added pralines to the product line in the 1930s. The business moved into the French Market at that time. The Aunt Sally’s shop operates there to this day. So, Bagur Southern owns the shop, presenting the iconic figure out front.

It comes as no surprise that a candy shop in the French Market sold  souvenirs. While postcard sales aren’t what they used to be, Teich’s New Orleans postcard no doubt did well at Aunt Sally’s.

Twelve Months New Orleans April

Twelve Months New Orleans April

Twelve Months New Orleans April, continuing the series by Enrique Alferez

twelve months new orleans april

Twelve Months New Orleans April

This image is the Fourth in a series of images by Enrique Alferez, published by Michael Higgins as “The Twelve Months of New Orleans.” Higgins published the illustrations in 1940. The image features dancers celebrating April’s spring festivals.

Enrique Alferez

Alferez was born in Northern Mexico on May 4, 1901. He studied at the Art Institute of Chicago from 1927 to 1929. He came to New Orleans in 1929. Alferez made New Orleans his home. He took advantage of various Works Progress Administration grants in the late 1930s. Alferez created a number of sculptures in the metro area, particularly in New Orleans City Park. He also designed the large fountain in front of Shushan Airport (now New Orleans Lakefront Airport.

Alferez drew and painted, as well as sculpting. He included many New Orleans landmarks in the “Twelve Months” booklet.

Twelve Months

Twelve Months New Orleans January

The title/cover page of the booklet says:

The
Twelve Months
of
New Orleans

A set of 12 Romantic
Lithographic Prints
In COLORS
Displaying 60 local subjects
drawn direct on the plate
with pen, brush, and crayon
by
Enrique Alferez

Printed and published by Michael Higgins
at 303 North Peters St
NEW ORLEANS

April’s Lithograph

Mardi Gras is over and March is all about Spring and Lent.

The Corners

Top Left: Baseball Opens. Baseball, featuring the New Orleans Pelicans. The border for the illustration includes baseballs and bats.

Top Right: N.O. Horse Show. Plantations and farms around New Orleans bred and raced horses for centuries. That culture continued into the 1940s. The New Orleans Horse Show featured the finest of local horses.

Bottom Left: “Flower Shows.” After Lent, every blooming flower offered an excuse for a show or festival. Competition between growers of specific varietals was intense.

Bottom Right: “Lovers in the Park” – Sitting out under a clear sky and full moon! Even before Daylight Saving Time, couples enjoyed Audubon and City Parks in the evening.

Music and Dance

Easter Sunday broke the solemnity of Lent and Holy Week. Springtime bloomed, warmed, and excited New Orleanians. That meant hot jazz! Alferez recognized our desire to snap our fingers and dance. He presents a couple dancing to a jazz trio of drums, trumpet and trombone. Alferez captions the image:

April
has
many
MUSIC
Festivals
Sweet
and
Hot,
White
and
Colored

See you for the fifth image in May.

 

Twelve Months New Orleans March Alferez

Twelve Months New Orleans March Alferez

Twelve Months New Orleans March, continuing the series by Enrique Alferez

Twelve months New Orleans March

Twelve Months New Orleans March

This image is the third in a series of images by Enrique Alferez, published by Michael Higgins as “The Twelve Months of New Orleans.” Higgins published the illustrations in 1940. The image features a St. Joseph’s Altar, a Catholic tradition brought to New Orleans by Sicilian immigrants. Families and parish church groups constructed altars ranging in size from small tables to massive displays to celebrate St. Joseph’s Day on March 19th. Can you read the caption in bottom right? I can’t.

Enrique Alferez

Alferez was born in Northern Mexico on May 4, 1901. He studied at the Art Institute of Chicago from 1927 to 1929. He came to New Orleans in 1929. Alferez made New Orleans his home. He took advantage of various Works Progress Administration grants in the late 1930s. Alferez created a number of sculptures in the metro area, particularly in New Orleans City Park. He also designed the large fountain in front of Shushan Airport (now New Orleans Lakefront Airport.

Alferez drew and painted, as well as sculpting. He included many New Orleans landmarks in the “Twelve Months” booklet.

Twelve Months

Twelve Months New Orleans January

The title/cover page of the booklet says:

The
Twelve Months
of
New Orleans

A set of 12 Romantic
Lithographic Prints
In COLORS
Displaying 60 local subjects
drawn direct on the plate
with pen, brush, and crayon
by
Enrique Alferez

Printed and published by Michael Higgins
at 303 North Peters St
NEW ORLEANS

March’s Lithograph

Mardi Gras is over and March is all about Spring and Lent.

The Corners

Top Left: Azalea Festival. Azaleas bloom in late Winter/early Spring in New Orleans. Celebrating nature is considered less tawdry (and within the confines of the solemnity of the Lenten season). So, a slightly-pagan festival marking the return of green things and lovely blossoms served as somewhat of an extension of Carnival.

Top Right: “Negro Music Feast.” By 1940, Jazz music had evolved, from the early Creole days. Jim Crow laws pushed many of the city’s best Black musicians away from New Orleans. Pops, Kid Ory, King Oliver, and so many more musicians made their way to Chicago, Los Angeles, and New York. The “Big Band” sound offered radio listeners swinging rhythms. Many in Orleans worked to keep “Dixieland” (now usually referred to as “Traditional”) jazz going with concerts featuring Black bands.

Bottom Left: “Away with luxuries for Lent.” Carnival is over, and it’s time for sacrifice.

Bottom Right: “???” – I can’t make out what the caption is here. Can you help? The imagery is of churches and cemeteries, keeping with the seriousness of Lent.

St. Joseph

St. Joseph occupies center stage in the March Litho. New Orleans observes the feast days of two patrons in March, St. Patrick and St. Joseph. Alferez presents the patron of the city’s Sicilian community. He places the viewer at one of the many “St. Joseph’s Altars” set up across New Orleans on March 19th. An image of St. Joseph, holding the infant Jesus, dominates the altar, which is laden with breads and sweets. Alferez captions the image:

To St. Joseph, on his Day,
March 19th, the Italians
build altars in their homes
and load them with foods which they give
at day’s end
to whomsoever
pops
in

There are three women in the center image. This is fitting, as the women of the Sicilian community did most of the work for St. Joseph Altars. One woman kneels in prayer before the central statues. Two other women (one assumes they already paid their respects) sit on the side, chatting and enjoying the day. While many families made their own, small, St. Joseph’s altars, the women of a neighborhood combined their efforts to make larger altars for their parishes. There was always a bit of healthy (and sometimes not-so-healthy) competition between the womens’ groups.

See you for the fourth image in April.

 

Twelve Months New Orleans February Alferez

Twelve Months New Orleans February Alferez

Twelve Months New Orleans February – continuing the series by Enrique Alferez

Twelve Months New Orleans February

Twelve Months New Orleans February

This image is the second in a series of images by Enrique Alferez, published by Michael Higgins as “The Twelve Months of New Orleans.” Higgins published the illustrations in 1940. The image features Rex, King of Carnival, in the center, with Cajuns, dock workers, women getting ashes, and Mardi Gras celebration on a French Quarter Balcony.

Enrique Alferez

Alferez was born in Northern Mexico on May 4, 1901. He studied at the Art Institute of Chicago from 1927 to 1929. He came to New Orleans in 1929. Alferez made New Orleans his home. He took advantage of various Works Progress Administration grants in the late 1930s. Alferez created a number of sculptures in the metro area, particularly in New Orleans City Park. He also designed the large fountain in front of Shushan Airport (now New Orleans Lakefront Airport.

Alferez drew and painted, as well as sculpting. He included many New Orleans landmarks in the “Twelve Months” booklet.

Twelve Months

Twelve Months New Orleans January

The title/cover page of the booklet says:

The
Twelve Months
of
New Orleans

A set of 12 Romantic
Lithographic Prints
In COLORS
Displaying 60 local subjects
drawn direct on the plate
with pen, brush, and crayon
by
Enrique Alferez

Printed and published by Michael Higgins
at 303 North Peters St
NEW ORLEANS

February’s Lithograph

The collection continues with Twelve Months New Orleans February. Sixty-eight years after Rex’s first parade, the King of Carnival dominates Mardi Gras. The four corners contain February-related scenes:

Top Left: Cajun fur-trappers. Men in the swamps collecting animals caught in traps. Women stitched the pelts together for jackets and coats.

This corner initially struck me in a different way. I saw the dark figures and the chains and went immediately to the enslaved. whew.

Top Right: The Banana Wharf. Longshoremen carrying bananas off of ships. New Orleans served as the main port for United Fruit for years.

Bottom Left: Women leaving St. Louis Cathedral on Ash Wednesday. They bear the ashen cross on their foreheads. Alvarez captioned this corner with just a +.

Bottom Right: “Time Out for Joy” – a woman celebrates from a French Quarter window/balcony..

Hail Rex

The print’s center features Rex, King of Carnival. The Rex Organization (also known as the School of Design), paraded for the first time in 1872.

In Twelve Months New Orleans February, Rex sits on his throne. He waves his scepter as two steeds pull the float through the streets of New Orleans. Maskers wave as Rex passes by. Alferez placed the caption below:

Rex, King of
Carnival Kings,
Rules New Orleans
For a day –
Mardi Gras

Alferez signed the litho at the bottom.

See you for the third image in March.

 

WWL Radio Dawnbusters Dupre and Vidacovich

WWL Radio Dawnbusters Dupre and Vidacovich

WWL Radio Dawnbusters program ran for twenty years in New Orleans.

wwl radio dawnbusters

WWL Radio Dawnbusters

The “Dawnbusters” radio program debuted on WWL in 1937. It was that era’s version televsion’s “Today” show, or “Good Morning America.” Since many people commuting to work in the 1930s did so via public transit, Dawnbusters wasn’t “drive-time” radio as we know it now. In the photo, Margie O’Dair chats with Henry Dupre, as bandleader Pinky Vidacovich watches. Do you remember “Dawnbusters?”

WWL-AM

The first commercial radio station in New Orleans began as a student effort at Loyola University in New Orleans. WWL broadcast from the Loyola campus with a ten-watt transmitter in 1922. The station grew in size and programming through the 1920s. By 1935, WWL joined the CBS Radio Network. The station left the uptown for a larger studio in the Fairmont Hotel (now the Roosevelt). While the station first signed on at 833KHZ, WWL moved to 870KHZ in 1941. It remains at 870 to this day.

Station operations at the Fairmont Hotel offered WWL options unavailable at Loyola. Additionally, WWL broadcast big-band and other concerts from the hotel’s popular nightclub, the Blue Room. WWL received “clear-channel” status, meaning no other radio station in the country operated on 870KHZ.

The show

Henry Dupre hosted WWL Radio Dawnbusters for the entire run of the show. A graduate of Jesuit New Orleans, he moved to New York to pursue an acting career. Henry returned to New Orleans in 1932. WWL hired Dupre that year. By 1937, he took charge of the morning show.

Dawnbusters presented both news and entertainment to the morning listeners. The show featured a full orchestra, conducted by Irving “Pinky” Vidacovich. In addition to his role as bandleader, Vidacovich performed skits as various characters. The show welcomed guest appearances by musicians as Al Hirt and Frankie Ford over the years.

After Dawnbusters

WWL Radio Dawnbusters ended its run in 1957. Dupre moved over to WWL-TV at that time. He hosted a morning cartoon show for children. Dupre hosted “Popeye and Pals” as “Uncle Henry,” from 1957 until his retirement in 1964. The program continued until 1991.

 

Edward “Kid” Ory Publicity Photo #JazzTuesday

Edward “Kid” Ory Publicity Photo #JazzTuesday

Edward “Kid” Ory Publicity Photo shows the trombonist at his best.

Edward "Kid" Ory Publicity Photo

Edward “Kid” Ory Publicity Photo

Publicity photo of Edward “Kid” Ory, taken by John E. Reed studios, Hollywood. Ory was born at Woodland Plantation, near LaPlace, Louisiana, on December 25, 1886. The photo, taken in the late 1940s, is inscribed, “to Tom.”

“Kid”

When he was in his teens, Ory (“Dutt” to his friends) took the train into New Orleans on Saturday mornings. They would “tailgate” in wagons, promoting their gig that evening, or they would go out to Milneburg in the afternoons. At the time, Milneburg was a small village of fishing camps, along with a few restaurants and hotels. They went from camp to camp, busking for tips. Ory saved enough money to buy a new trombone from Werlein’s on Canal Street. He moved from LaPlace to Uptown New Orleans, living with his sister.

While living uptown, King Bolden heard Dutt play. Bolden tried to recruit Ory, but his sister wouldn’t let him play music professionally (all week long, rather than weekend gigs) until he was twenty-one. Bolden’s health issues were such that Dutt didn’t get to play with him. By the 1910s, Ory assembled bands featuring King Oliver, Louis Armstrong, and other top New Orleans musicians.

California and Chicago

Like many Creole musicians, Ory left New Orleans. Jazz grew in popularity in the 1910s. Jim Crow segregation made life in New Orleans difficult. He left New Orleans for Los Angeles in 1919. In 1925, Dutt moved to Chicago. By 1930, Dutt retired from music. He moved back to Los Angeles. Ory returned to performing in 1943. He played in Los Angeles and San Francisco. Kid Ory retired from performance a second time in 1966, and passed away in 1973.

Creole Trombone and 1811 House

John McCusker documents Ory’s life and influence on Jazz and its musicians in his book, Creole Trombone: Kid Ory and the Early Years of Jazz. McCusker’s latest project is the 1811/Kid Ory Historic House, The house, located at 1128 LA 628, Laplace, LA.

The house is, “One of the oldest structures in St. John the Baptist parish, the 1811/Kid Ory Historic House figures in two noteworthy moments in American history: The 1811 rebellion of enslaved people and the dawn of jazz.”

Photo courtesy the Louisiana State Museum collection.