Bill Russell led the New Orleans Jazz Revival #jazztuesday

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Bill Russell led the New Orleans Jazz Revival of the 1940s. Bill Russel, musician, composer, historian William Russell, shown here standing on Rue Burgundy, was a composer, musician, and jazz historian. He was born in Canton, MO, in 1905. Russell developed a reputation for his percussion composition skills. While his "Fugue for eight percussion instruments" played Carnegie Hall in 1933,...
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St. Aloysius Robinson Atlas #BOSHSunday @BMHSCrusaders

St. Aloysius Robinson Atlas #BOSHSunday @BMHSCrusaders

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St. Aloysius Robinson Atlas shows the original location of the school. St. Aloysius Robinson Atlas The 1883 Robinson Atlas of New Orleans is an invaluable resource. Here's the caption from the book: Robinson Atlas. This 1883 atlas shows the location of St. Aloysius Academy in Block 18. Just to the left, in Block 19, is the Archbishop's residence and St....
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Twelve Months New Orleans January Alferez

Twelve Months New Orleans January Alferez

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Twelve Months New Orleans January - first of a series by Enrique Alferez Twelve Months New Orleans January This image is the first in a series of images by Enrique Alferez, published by Michael Higgins as "The Twelve Months of New Orleans." Higgins published the illustrations in 1940. Enrique Alferez Alferez was born in Northern Mexico on May 4, 1901....
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NOLA History Guy Podcast 16-May-2020 – Katy Shannon Part I

NOLA History Guy Podcast 16-May-2020 – Katy Shannon Part I

NOLA History Guy Podcast 16-May-2020 is part one of our interview with Katy Morlas Shannon

NOLA History Guy Podcast 16-May-2020

Original location of the International Trade Mart, Camp and Common Streets.

NOLA History Guy Podcast 16-May-2020

Two segments on a longer edition of NOLA History Guy Podcast this week. First is our pick of the week from Today in New Orleans History. Additionally, part one of our interview with Katy Morlas Shannon.

May 13, 1966 – City agrees with International Trade Mart on a new building

nola history guy podcast 16-May-2020

Architectural rendering of the World Trade Center Building as the Four Seasons Hotel (courtesy DDD)

Our Pick of the Week from NewOrleansPast.com is May 13th. On that date in 1966, the city finalized an agreement with the International Trade Mart. The Mart wanted a new headquarters building, So, they acquired property at 2 Canal Street. The organization’s first headquarters was the above building at the corner of Camp and Common Streets. Mayor Vic Schiro continued Chep Morrison’s plans in his administration. The goal was to make New Orleans a gateway to Central and South America. Modernizing the ITM contributed to this. So, the organization built a 33-story office building at the foot of Canal. That building remains a part of the downtown skyline.

nola history guy podcast 16-May-2020

“ITM Building” – watercolor by Jeanette Boutell Woest, 1966. via HNOC

In 1985, the ITM merged with International House to become the World Trade Center. The ITM building housed a number of international companies. That’s how the “Mart” worked. Additionally, the building housed foreign consulate offices. As the city’s economy shifted from port traffic and the oil industry to tourism, things changed. While the ITM building was a good location, newer office towers on Poydras appealed to companies. Hurricane Katrina emptied the building. Even the World Trade Center moved across the street to One Canal Place. In 2012, the organization gave the unoccupied building to the city. So, it will soon become a Four Seasons Hotel.

The New Orleans Bee

NOLA History Guy Podcast 16-May-2020

The New Orleans Bee was a French-language newspaper that began in 1827. L’Abeille (its French name) offered New Orleans’ Creole community the news for over a century. So, we spoke with author and historian Katy Morlas Shannon about her background, The Bee, and how she came to curate the selection of articles from the paper’s first year.

NOLA History Guy Podcast 16-May-2020

The New Orleans Bee: Dispatches from the first year of Louisiana’s longest-running French-language newspaper – Kindle Edition

The Plantations

NOLA History Guy Podcast 16-May-2020

The Big House at Whitney Plantation

Whitney Plantation

nola history guy podcast 16-May-2020

Laura Plantation

Laura Plantation

nola history guy podcast 16-May-2020

Evergreen Plantation

Evergreen Plantation

Katy Morlas Shannon

 

NOLA History Guy Podcast 16-May-2020

Crown baseball tee from Fleurty Girl

We did this interview via Zoom, but only used the audio for the podcast. Katy had a really cool t-shirt from Fleurty Girl on!

Katy M. Shannon on Facebook.

I promise, we’ll get back to the Riverfront Streetcar Line in a few weeks! While we’ll be talking to folks, research continues. Therefore, the Riverfront segments offer lots of details.

Royal Street Photo Breakdown – NOLA History Guy Podcast

Royal Street Photo Breakdown – NOLA History Guy Podcast

Royal Street Photo Breakdown on this week’s podcast!

Royal Street Photo Breakdown

100-200 Blocks of Royal Street, 1916.

Royal Street Photo Breakdown

Derby Gisclair shared a neat photo from 1916 earlier this week on social media. The photographer stands in the middle of the 100 block of Royal Street, looking down into the 200 block. As I was looking through some other photos, I came across a 1956 photo of Royal, where that photographer stood almost in the same place. Time for a Royal Street Photo Breakdown!

At the top of the page is the 1916 photo, with Solari’s on the left, an electric sign for Fabacher’s Restaurant hanging over the street, then the Commercial Hotel and Union Bank on the right.

Royal Street Photo Breakdown

Franck-Bertacci Studios photo of the 100-200 blocks of Royal Street, 1956.

Fast forward to 1956. Solari’s is still on the left. The Commercial Hotel is now the Monteleone Hotel. Fabacher’s Restaurant, which was the hotel restaurant for the Commercial, is long closed. Walgreen’s drug store replaced the bank building in the late 1940s. That drug store remains today.

Streetcar changes

In the 1916 photo, streetcar tracks and the overhead wiring are visible. The Desire streetcar line ran inbound on Royal Street. The streetcars turned right onto Canal Street. They ran up one block, then turned right again. They ran down Bourbon Street for the French Quarter portion of the outbound run. We’ve talked about the Desire line before, and how it was the main connector for the Quarter.

Buses replaced streetcars on Desire in 1948. So, by the 1956 photo, the tracks and wires are long gone. The maroon-and-cream NOPSI buses serviced Desire.

NewOrleansPast.com – January 15th

Royal Street Photo Breakdown

NOPSI 817, operating in Belt Service in the 1940s.

Our pick of the week from NewOrleansPast.com (Facebook page, Today in New Orleans History) is Ms. Campanella’s entry for January 15th. The Tulane streetcar line rolled for the first time on 15-January-1871. Mules pulled the streetcars then. The line switched to electric streetcars in the 1890s. Tulane operated in “belt service” with the St. Charles line from 1900 to 1951. Listen to our podcast episode on “Riding the Belt” for more details on that.

NOPSI converted the West End streetcar line to diesel buses on 15-January, 1950, as part of the trend away from electric street rail operations. West End operated as steam train service until the 1890s. After that, electric streetcars ran out to the lakefront, along the east bank of the New Basin Canal. NOPSI retired streetcars on West End in 1950. The line ran until the 1960s, when it became the Canal-Lakeshore line.

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NOLA History Guy Podcast 18-May-2019 – French Market and The Beast

NOLA History Guy Podcast 18-May-2019 – French Market and The Beast

More Southern Rebellion in NOLA History Guy Podcast 18-May-2019

nolahistoryguy podcast 18-May-2019

Butler’s General Order 28, 15-May-1862, as printed in the Daily Picayune.

NOLA History Guy Podcast 18-May-2019

Two segments as we’ve been doing for NOLA History Guy Podcast 18-May-2019. We discuss the French Market and Mayor Cantrell’s ideas on re-vamping the market in the first segment, then back to 1862 for the second segment.

The French Market

NOLA History Guy Podcast 18-May-2019

New Orleans French Market (courtesy Wikimedia Commons user MusikAnimal)

NOLA.com allowed a story about Mayor LaToya Cantrell’s plans for re-vamping the French Market get away from them this weekend. The article is titled, Mayor Cantrell wants the French Market to be like Seattle’s Pike Place. So, T-P presents a clickbait headline. It’s guaranteed to rile up the locals. Offer a comparison of anything in New Orleans to anything in Seattle, and, well, thems fightin’ words!

Open-air, public markets have a rich history in New Orleans. The first of those was the French Market, along the river. As the city grew, Faubourg Treme and Faubourg Ste. Marie opened markets as well. So, by the 1920s, most neighborhoods had public markets. Air conditioning and commercial refrigeration created the shift from the open markets to grocery stores and supermarkets. Shopping styles shifted after World War II. Therefore, construction of supermarkets began when rationing and building restrictions ended.

Post-War French Market

While truck farmers continued to bring produce to the French Market, the butchers and fishmongers moved to supermarkets. The buildings in the French Market closer to Jackson Square grew quiet. By the late 1970s, Dutch Morial recognized the need to boost the Market area. Dutch renovated the buildings. So, Morial’s face-lift attracted artisans and food shops. Fast forward forty years, and it’s time for another renovation and re-vamp. Mayor Cantrell explores successful markets in Seattle and Philadelphia (Reading Market), to see what will work in New Orleans.

General Order 28

Major General Benjamin Butler issued General Order 28, the “Women’s Order,” on 15-May-1862. The Daily Picayune published the full text of the order (illustration above). So, the order enters the Lost Cause mythos after the war. At the time, Butler did what was necessary for an occupying commander. He pacified resistance and re-opened the port.

Today in New Orleans History