Penn Central Heritage 1073 @nscorp #trainthursday

Penn Central Heritage 1073 @nscorp #trainthursday

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Penn Central heritage 1073 operating on the Norfolk Southern #BackBelt. Penn Central heritage 1073. From December 30, 2020, Norfolk Southern heritage 1073 heads eastbound on the Norfolk Southern #BackBelt, to the NS Gentilly yard. The engine is an EMD SD70ACe. While the engine bears the livery of the old Penn Central Railroad, it's an NS unit and operates as such....
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Pumping Station 6 Metairie @SWBNewOrleans

Pumping Station 6 Metairie @SWBNewOrleans

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Pumping Station 6 drains 17th Street Canal. Pumping Station 6 Drawings from Historic American Building Survey LA-1235, Pumping Station 6, Orpheum and Hyacinth Streets. This pumping station spans the 17th Street Canal, just north of Metairie Road. Built in 1899, it's the oldest station in service today. Wood-screw pumps designed by A. Baldwin Wood replaced the original pumps in the...
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AMTK Crescent Plus ATIP Car

AMTK Crescent Plus ATIP Car

AMTK Crescent plus ATIP car on the #backbelt in New Orleans.

amtk crescent plus atip

cross-posted to New Orleans Railroads.

AMTK Crescent plus ATIP

Amtrak Crescent #20 Northbound on the NS #BackBelt, 15 minutes out of Union Passenger Terminal in New Orleans (NOL). The red car directly behind the engines is DOTX 221, a Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) Automatic Track Inspection Program (ATIP) car. DOTX 221 was originally a VIA Rail (Canada) sleeper-lounge-buffet car. It was later sold to Hartwell Lowe Corporation, who operated it as private car, “Belle McKee.”

DOTX 221 uses the classic Tuscan Red livery of the Pennsylvania Railroad (PRR). Norfolk Southern absorbed PRR. So, it’s good to see a bit of a shout-out to a classic livery.

Special Cars

Amtrak restricted special cars prior to the pandemic. The rules for hitching along on scheduled trains present challenges for most “private varnish” cars. Additionally, cars with open observation decks don’t fit the requirements at all. So, the number of special cars coming and going from New Orleans is limited. AMTK Crescent plus ATIP is a treat.

While the private cars aren’t rolling, DOTX 221 continues its job. This car belongs to the Federal Railroad Administration. So, it’s not restricted.

ATIP

The Automated Track Inspection Program (ATIP) cars operate as part of regularly scheduled trains. Rather than running special consists for track inspection, the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) hitches rides. So, track inspection happens on a consistent basis. Trains run normally.

FRA hitches ATIP cars to Amtrak trains because they (usually) stick to schedule. They also move at a faster clip than freight consists. The FRA gets their data with minimal disruption.

Crescent #20

Amtrak currently operates the following consist on the Northbound Crescent out of NOL:

  • 2 Genesis engines
  • 3 Coach cars
  • 1 Cafe car
  • 2 Sleepers
  • 1 Bag-dorm car

Additionally, the Crescent still operates on a 3-trains-a-week schedule, cut back from daily, due to the pandemic. So, #20 departs NOL on Sundays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays. It returns to NOL on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Saturdays. Hopefully we’ll see more “special” trains like AMTK Crescent plus ATIP.

 

 

Lakefront Drive-In Theater 1940

Lakefront Drive-In Theater 1940

Lakefront Drive-In Theater, in 1940.

Lakefront Drive-in Theater

“Drive-in Theater” on Canal Blvd, 1940.

Lakefront Drive-In Theater

Last year, I presented a lecture at the National World War II Museum, entitled, Winning the War on the Lakefront. The talk started at West End and the New Canal, then moved along the lakefront to the Industrial Canal. Every time I’ve presented this lecture, folks in attendance asked about a facility in what is now the East Lakeshore subdivision. Turns out, it was a Lakefront Drive-in Theater.

The Army and Navy hospitals.

lakefront drive-in theater

Aerial photo of Lagarde Army Hospital (bottom), and Naval Hospital New Orleans (top), 1940

The Orleans Levee Board reclaimed a great deal of land along the lakefront in the late 1920s. For reference, around 1910, the Mount Carmel Convent on Robert E. Lee Blvd had a fishing pier out front. It extended into the lake from almost the front door. The OLB reclaimed the area from there, up to where Lakeshore Drive is now.

The WPA made major improvements to the lakefront in 1938-1939. They built the seawall and Lakeshore drive. The reclaimed land belonged to the city. So, when the US Army and US Navy looked to build hospitals in New Orleans, the lakefront area appealed to them. The Army built Lagarde Army Hospital in what is now West Lakeshore. The Navy built Naval Hospital New Orleans on the other side of Canal Blvd. The breeze off Lake Pontchartrain cooled down the area at a time when air-conditioning was not ubiquitous. While the hospitals had different missions, they both benefited from the location.

What’s that thing?

Lakefront Drive-in Theater

Ad for the “Drive-in Theater,” 1940

I found some good aerial shots of the lakefront in 1940. They show the WPA improvements and the hospitals nicely. They also show a facility with a bunch of arcs, right behind Naval Hospital New Orleans. I dismissed it as maybe some kind of outdoor amphitheater, perhaps for concerts and other entertainment. Folks asked, “What’s that thing?” I replied with the outdoor entertainment answer.

Well, that answer wasn’t exactly wrong! I shared an Infrogmation photo of the bus stand at Canal and Robert E. Lee a couple of days ago. Arthur “Mardi Hardy” Hardy, musician, teacher, and local Carnival expert, replied to that image. Arthur said there was a drive-in movie theater, there on the other side of Canal Blvd, from the bus stand. He shared the ad (above) in the comment thread. The name of the place really was just, “Drive-In Theater.”

DING! That must be the “thing” behind Naval Hospital New Orleans. It makes sense, the quarter-circle pattern of the facility. Everything converges on the point of the right angle. That’s the screen. Public transportation to get out to the hospitals was limited (just the West End Streetcar). So, most folks drove out to there for work. Maybe stop and catch a movie before heading all the way home? Makes a lot of sense.

Movie Theater Project

I know Arthur has a book in progress on local movie theaters. So, I have yet another reason to buy it when it’s done. Thanks, Arthur!

 

Hickory Creek Private Railcar on the New Orleans #BackBelt

Hickory Creek Private Railcar on the New Orleans #BackBelt

Hickory Creek is an ex-New York Central observation car.

hickory creek

Private varnish “Hickory Creek,” bringing up the rear of the Amtrak Crescent #20, 30-Dec-2019. (Edward Branley photo)

Hickory Creek on the #BackBelt

The ex-New York Central car, Hickory Creek, brought up the rear on the Amtrak Crescent, on its way to Penn Station on 30-December-2019. I don’t know the details of this particular trip for Hickory Creek, if they came down just to New Orleans, or if this was a return from going all the way out to Los Angeles. Either way, the car headed back north on Monday morning.

New York Central’s 20th Century Limited

hickory creek

Poster for the New York Central’s 20th Century Limited, featuring the 1948 trainset.

Hickory Creek was one of the “sleeper observation” cars put into service by the New York Central in 1948. So, the railroad switched the train to diesel (EMD units) in 1945, ordering new trainsets as well. General of the Army Dwight D. Eisenhower rode the inaugural run in 1948. The train ran until 1967.

Consist

So, the train began operation in 1902. A typical 20th Century Limited consist, including Hickory Creek, in 1965 looked like this:

  • E7A diesel locomotive: NYC 4025;
  • E8A diesel locomotive: NYC 4080;
  • E7A diesel locomotive: NYC 4007;
  • MB Class Baggage-mail car: NYC 5018;
  • CSB Class Baggage-dormitory car: NYC 8979;
  • PB Class Coach: NYC 2942;
  • DG Class Grill-diner: NYC 450;
  • PAS Class Sleepercoach (16-Single Room 10-Double Room): NYC 10811;
  • PAS Class Sleepercoach (16-Single Room 10-Double Room): NYC 10817;
  • PS Class Sleeper (22-roomette): NYC 10355 BOSTON HARBOR;
  • DKP Class Kitchen-Lounge Car: NYC 477;
  • DE Class Dining Room Car: NYC 406;
  • PS Class Sleeper (10-roomette 6-double bedroom): NYC 10171 CURRENT RIVER;
  • PS Class Sleeper (12-double bedroom): NYC 10511 PORT OF DETROIT;
  • Class PS Sleeper (12-double bedroom): NYC 10501 PORT BYRON;
  • Class PSO Sleeper-Buffet-Lounge-Observation (5-double bedroom): NYC 10633 HICKORY CREEK.

(Source: Wikipedia)

Hickory Creek after the New York Central

Since the railroad discontinued the 20th Century Limited before the creation of Amtrak in 1971, the rolling stock didn’t go over to the new operator. Ringling Brothers Circus bought Hickory Creek. Since they didn’t need Pullman quality, the circus used it as dorm-style housing. They ripped out the interior of the car.

hickory creek

Hickory Creek, prior to the 2014 restoration. (Fred Heide photo)

In 2014, Star Trak, Inc., acquired Hickory Creek. They restored the car for private operation. So, the team modified original Pullman Standard design of five bedrooms to four. Since modern operations of private cars involve hitching on Amtrak trains, the team reduced the bedrooms to add showers. Trains Magazine published an article on the restoration by Mr. Fred Heide in November, 2014.

Modern floorplan

hickory creek

Post-restoration floor plan of Hickory Creek.

In addition to reducing the number of bedrooms, the 2014 restoration changed the galley area. The 1948 design of Hickory Creek included a small galley, for preparing snacks and drinks. So, the Star Trak team converted the space into a full-service kitchen. Again, this fits with modern use of private cars. They’re designed to be independent of the trains pulling them.

hickory creek

Observation area of the restored Hickory Creek. (photo courtesy Simon Pielow)

While the bedrooms and galley changed a bit, the team kept the rear observation area true to the 1948 design.

Private Rail on the #BackBelt

hickory creek

Private car Hickory Creek on the #BackBelt in New Orleans, behind an Amtrak baggage/dorm car. (Edward Branley photo)

I spend a lot of mornings at the PJ’s Coffee Shop at 5555 Canal Boulevard. The baristas here are great and the regulars are nice folks. Regulars occasionally ask me why I get up and record/photograph the Crescent as it heads out of town. It’s pretty much the same consist each morning, but then there are the days when something extra brings up the rear.

 

Arch Roof streetcars at the Cemeteries 1963 #StreetcarMonday

Arch Roof streetcars at the Cemeteries 1963 #StreetcarMonday

Arch Roof Streetcars stack up at the Cemeteries Terminal, 1963

1963 arch roof streetcars

Five arch roof streetcars at the Cemeteries Terminal, Canal Street, 1963 (Connecticut Archives photo)

Arch Roof Streetcars in 1963

The 1923-vintage 800- and 900-series arch roof streetcars serviced the Canal line starting in the 1930s. Prior to 1935, the American Car Company’s “Palace” cars ran on Canal. New Orleans Public Service, Incorporated (NOPSI) standardized streetcar operations when the company took over the system. They liked the Perley A. Thomas, arch roof design. Since NOPSI wanted to phase out streetcar operations in favor of buses, they used these cars everywhere. Preparations to convert Canal to buses began in 1959. By 1963, NOPSI reached the ready point. Still, the busiest line in the city had to keep going, so the arch roof streetcars kept moving.

The Canal line

The Canal Street line terminated at the Cemeteries since the 1930s. After “belt service” was discontinued, the streetcars made a left-turn onto City Park Avenue. They came to a stop on City Park Avenue. A switch in the street enabled the streetcars to change tracks to from outbound to inbound and vice versa. The West End line continued up City Park Avenue, turning at the New Basin Canal for the run up to Lake Pontchartrain.

When West End converted to buses in 1947, NOPSI re-designed the Cemeteries Terminal. They removed the left-turn onto City Park. NOPSI installed a double-slip switch in the Canal Street neutral ground. That switch/terminal remained until June of 1964. NOPSI removed all the track at that time. Bus operation replaced the arch roof streetcars. The Canal (Cemeteries) bus line made a right-turn from Canal Street. The buses went half a block to the start of Canal Boulevard, then pulled into a U-turn terminal in the 5600 block of Canal Blvd.

Terminal operations

In this photo, five cars are in/near the terminal. The streetcar on the left is on the inbound track, behind the switch. The second car from the left enters the switch from the outbound track, starting its inbound run. This was common for the Cemeteries Terminal. This happens regularly at S. Carrollton and S. Claiborne, at the end of the St. Charles line.

The three streetcars to the right wait on the outbound track. When the first two cars depart for downtown, those cars will enter both sides of the terminal. They depart per the schedule.

The Cemeteries Terminal changed when streetcars returned to Canal in 2004. Instead of a a two-track terminal, the line came down to a single track. Outbound streetcars stopped just before a single crossover. The lead outbound car rode through the switch, to the end bumper. The operator changed the poles. Upon departure, the streetcar crossed to the inbound track. Streetcars waited, similar to the three on the right in the photo, for their turn to go through the switch.

The 2000-series streetcars used today ride through the Canal/City Park intersection, to Canal Blvd. The current incarnation of the terminal consists of two u-turn tracks. Canal uses point-to-loop operation.