Andy Bourgeois leads Cor Jesu football #BOSHSunday

Andy Bourgeois leads Cor Jesu football #BOSHSunday

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Andy Bourgeois becomes the first football coach at Cor Jesu. Andy Bourgeois Mr. Andy Bourgeois was the first head football coach at Cor Jesu High School. The school announced it would compete in Catholic League athletics in the fall of 1964. So, Cor Jesu's administration named its first athletic staff in January, 1965. College Prep From its opening in 1954...
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Governor Elect Buddy Roemer 1988

Governor Elect Buddy Roemer 1988

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Governor Elect Buddy Roemer at NOCCA, for an event in 1988. Governor Elect Buddy Roemer Buddy Roemer made an appearance and spoke at an event at the New Orleans Center for the Creative Arts, on January 18, 1988. At the time, Romer held the Fourth District seat (Shreveport/NW Louisiana), from 1981 to March of 1988. In the Fall of 1987,...
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St. Aloysius Robinson Atlas #BOSHSunday @BMHSCrusaders

St. Aloysius Robinson Atlas #BOSHSunday @BMHSCrusaders

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St. Aloysius Robinson Atlas shows the original location of the school. St. Aloysius Robinson Atlas The 1883 Robinson Atlas of New Orleans is an invaluable resource. Here's the caption from the book: Robinson Atlas. This 1883 atlas shows the location of St. Aloysius Academy in Block 18. Just to the left, in Block 19, is the Archbishop's residence and St....
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Junior Philharmonic Society New Orleans concert program

Junior Philharmonic Society New Orleans concert program

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Junior Philharmonic Society New Orleans concert program 1952 Junior Philharmonic Society New Orleans Program for the annual recital of the Junior Philharmonic Society New Orleans. The recital was held on January 16, 1952. The Society holds an annual recital featuring instrumental, voice, and dance performances. Students audition for the recital. Since 1948 The Society is still around, From their Mission...
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JC Ellis Memories

JC Ellis Memories

JC Ellis Memories of my elementary school days.

JC Ellis Memories

JC Ellis Memories

I’ve been working on de-cluttering my home office this week. In the back of my desk drawer, I found a ziplok bag with a bunch of stuff from my childhood. Boy Scout medals and patches, assorted pins and buttons, etc. I pulled out a button from J. C. Ellis Elementary School in #themetrys. I attended J. C. Ellis (after Kindergarten at Kehoe-France in 1963-64) for grades 1-4, 1964 to 1968. Momma moved my sister and I from Ellis to St. Angela Merici for the 68-69 school year. She felt that attending Catholic school would improve our chances of getting into Catholic high schools. Keep in mind, this was peak baby boom, and acceptance into those schools (Brother Martin for me, Archbishop Chapelle for my sister) wasn’t a given.

Private to Public to Catholic

Jefferson Parish Public Schools didn’t offer Kindergarten back in the day. So, my parents sent me to Kehoe-France. While we lived in the area for Metairie Grammar School on Metairie Road, my mom, the late Anne Finicle Branley, was principal at Ellis. Therefore, she brought me to her school. I don’t recall much in the way of privilege by being the principal’s kid. In fact, I don’t remember seeing my mom much during the school day. After class ended, I went over to the library to wait for her to go home. I read encyclopedias. Yeah, I was that kid.

Awards

I don’t recall specifically why I received this award button. At first I thought it was for Safety Patrol, but I didn’t do that until fifth grade at St. Angela. So, I’m stumped on the details. Even though Ellis had a Cub Scout pack, I joined the pack at Mulholland Memorial Methodist on Metairie Road. Momma was adamant about not mixing work and family. She didn’t want to have to talk to Ellis parents outside of work. I did Boy Scouts at St. Angela.

Ellis is still there more

My JC Ellis Memories come back when I’m in the school’s neighborhood. That’s relatively frequent, since I shop regularly at Martin Wine Cellar. That store is the old Sena Mall movie theater. While many of the businesses on Veterans Blvd. changed, go one block back on Brockenbraugh Court, and Ellis is still rolling. I’ve been thinking about my mom and her years of work in the parish public school system. I don’t think she would approve of the rush to return to school in the face of the novel coronavirus.

Fortier High School football – friday night lights in the forties

Fortier High School football – friday night lights in the forties

Fortier High School football – FNL

fortier high school football

The Alcee Fortier High School football, 1940s

Fortier High School Football

This is a Franck Studios photo of a football team from Alcee Fortier High School. I’m thinking this is from the 1940s rather than the 1950s, but there’s so little to go on in terms of identification. They look like your basic football team from the time before integration.

Alcee Fortier High School

Fortier High School Football

Fortier High School, on Freret and Nashville, Uptown. The facility is now Lusher High School.

The school opened in 1931. Fortier occupied the Uptown block bounded by Freret, Joseph, Loyola, and Nashville, The main entrance fronted Freret Street. Fortier opened as an all-boys, all-white school. It integrated as part of the school district’s plan, in 1961. The student body lost lost white students steadily through the 1960s and 1970s, due to white flight.

Fortier offered German language classes prior to World War II. It was one of the few schools in the city that taught the language.

Hurricane Katrina

Fortier declined dramatically in quality in the 1990s. By the early 2000s, it was rated as one of the worst schools in the city. The Louisiana Legislature pointed to schools like Fortier and demanded changes. They created the Recovery School District. The state tasked RSD with taking over public schools in Orleans Parish. They believed the Orleans Parish School Board could not handle the job any longer.

Within a year of the RSD’s creation, Hurricane Katrina struck. The storm’s aftermath changed all the plans for public schools. RSD permanently closed many schools. Fortier was one of them. RSD authorized charter schools across the city. Those new schools occupied the buildings of many older, failing schools.

Lusher High School

Lusher Elementary School opened on Willow Street in Carrollton in 1917. The school board expanded Lusher, opening a middle school, in 1990. The middle school used the old Carrollton Courthouse. That building housed Benjamin Franklin High School until that school moved to the University of New Orleans campus.

Lusher Elementary and Middle converted to a charter school in the wake of Katrina. The community planned a high school, going back to 2003. The charter enabled them to move on those plans. They opened the Fortier Campus as Lusher High School in 2006.