St. Aloysius Panther Yearbook 1933 – N. Rampart Street #BOSHbook

St. Aloysius Panther Yearbook 1933 – N. Rampart Street #BOSHbook

St. Aloysius Panther Yearbook 1933

st. aloysius panther yearbook

St. Aloysius High School, N. Rampart Street side, 1933 (BOSH photo)

St. Aloysius Panther Yearbook 1933

St Aloysius Panther Yearbook in 1933 featured a shot from the N. Rampart Street side, 1933. This photo is in the St. Aloysius Panther Yearbook.

Esplanade and N. Rampart

The Brothers of the Sacred Heart operated St. Aloysius High on the corner of Esplanade Avenue and North Rampart Street from 1892 to May, 1969. The school used a mansion on the corner from 1892 to 1924. The BOSH tore down that building in 1924, replacing it with the one in the photo. So, the yearbook staff shot this photo when the school was nine years old.

Usually, photographers shot the school from the Esplanade side. This is an interesting and less-common perspective. Students use all entrances of a school during the day, depending on the bus or streetcar they take to get there. St. Aloysius had a large, paved front yard, on the Esplanade side. Students went outside for lunch and between classes.

Panthers to Crusaders

The mascot of St. Aloysius High in the early 1930s was the Panthers. The school’s colors were purple and gold. Therefore the pages of the 1933 yearbook have the purple trim you see in this image. Brother Martin Hernandez, SC, didn’t like the school using purple and gold, because those are LSU’s colors. He changed the colors to crimson and white. At the same time, Brother Martin changed the school’s mascot to “Crusaders”. The Crusader, in his white cloak with crimson cross gave the school a much more unique look.

When the BOSH opened Cor Jesu High School in 1954, they chose crimson and gold for that school’s colors. They became the Cor Jesu Kingsmen. Over the summer of 1969, the BOSH decided to use Cor Jesu’s colors and the St. Aloysius mascot for the combined school, Brother Martin High School.

Fifty Years of Brother Martin

The 2018-2019 year marks fifty years of service to the community by Brother Martin High, but it’s 150 years for the Crusaders.

Maroon Monday

Maroon Monday – 1944

This week’s Maroon Monday takes us back to World War II.

MB ad Loyola Maroon 1944

Maison Blanche ad from the Loyola Maroon, October 27, 1944.

October, 1944 – The Allies invaded Europe in June of that year, and the war in the Pacific was still hot and heavy. Still, Loyola University continued its mission, educating the men and women still at home in the United States. The Loyola Maroon, the student newspaper, still went to press. Even students needed to have a “business dress” wardrobe, for school functions, social events, etc.

“Definitely collegiate” the ad says, and that makes sense. Wool herringbone pattern fabric made for a more laid-back suit than, say, classic blue serge. Herringbone tweed is the classic “professor’s” sport coat.  When I was on the Brother Martin High debate team in the mid-1970s, I absolutely loved my wool-herringbone suit. It was a dark green, and just perfect for scholarly pursuits like speech and debate. The ad’s suggestions show the level of formality of the time. Wearing a suit to “spectator sports?”

Naturally, the collegiate looking for a suit in 1944 would head to Canal Street for a suit. He’d likely pass on the higher-end men’s shops, like Porter’s or Rubenstein’s, in favor of one of the big department stores, like D. H. Holmes or Maison Blanche.

MB knew their prices would be better suited to the student budget. The young man in need of such a suit could jump on the St. Charles streetcar, ride it from uptown to Canal Street, and walk from Carondelet and Canal, cross Canal Street, then head one block up Canal to Dauphine and Maison Blanche. The men’s department of the “Greatest Store South” was on the first floor. The young man would be greeted by a salesman who would take his measurments, grab the suit that caught his eye in the proper size, and then mark it up for the tailor. It would be ready in a few days, and he would be ready for that next football game, or on-campus social function.

As a writer, this triggers all sorts of inspiration for a story. A young man, at MB, buying a suit, while other young men his age are in France and Belgium, fighting the Nazis. Why was he home? Why wasn’t he in a plane over Europe, or in a Higgins Boat, landing on islands in the Pacific, fighting the Japanese? Oh, the possibilities…

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Maison Blanche Department Stores, by Edward J. Branley

For more on the fascinating history of Maison Blanche, be sure to pick up my book, Maison Blanche Department Stores.

Maroon Monday – SS President in 1933

Maroon Monday – SS President in 1933

Maroon Monday – SS President in 1933

loyola maroon ad 1933

Ad for the SS President steamboat in the Loyola Maroon, November 17, 1933

Kicking off a new feature here – “Maroon Monday” – featuring ads and other interesting items from The Maroon, the student newspaper at Loyola University New Orleans.

Our first Maroon feature is from 1933. It’s an ad for dance cruises on the riverboat SS President. Riverboat cruises go back to the 1910s and earlier. The steamboats did nightly dance cruises, and afternoon trips on weekends. The cost in 1933 was seventy-five cents; by the time I was in high school in the mid-70s, a Friday night cruise on the President cost five dollars.

The band on the President in the fall of 1933 was “Fate Marable and his famous Cotton Pickers”. Marable was a well-established band leader, one of the musicians filled the void left when Buddy Bolden stopped performing in the 1900s. Marable worked with riverboat owners, putting together bands of black jazz musicians. Joe “King” Oliver and Louis Armstrong were just two of the musicians who played in Marable’s riverboat bands in the 1920s. Marable’s bands played on the SS Capitol and other riverboats of the time. Those wooden boats had a short lifespan, however. The Streckfus Company upgraded the President, rebuilding the superstructure in steel. The boat officially called St. Louis home, but it moved back and forth from St. Louis to New Orleans as Streckfus chose.

While the name “Cotton Pickers” for a “creole jazz” combo may be a bit cringe-worthy now, it was code for a “colored band” in Jim Crow Louisiana. There are a couple of photos of Marable’s bands in New Orleans Jazz.

 

Steamer SS President in 1970

Steamer SS President, New Orleans, 1970 (unknown photographer, State Library of Louisiana Collection)

Here is the SS President, thirty-seven years later, in 1970. We would go on the President to see “Colour”, a 70s Beatles Cover band, among other acts. The boat had not changed much from those “new” days, back in the 1930s.

 

Jesuits in New Orleans, 1889

Caption: Top Row: 1. Mr. Alphonse Otis 2. Mr. Claude Roche 3. Mr. Andrew Brown 4. Mr. Joseph Raby 5. Mr. Daniel Lawton 6. Mr. Henry Maring 7 Mr. Emile Mattern 8. Mr. Henry Devine 9 Fr. William Power 10 Mr. Patrick Cronin 11 Mr. Ashton ; Bottom Row: Fr. Courtote 2. Fr. Anthony Free, ob. 1891 3. Fr. Aloysius Curioz. 4 Fr. David McKiniry 5 Fr. John O'Shanahan S.Mis. 6. Fr. Nicholas Davis 7 Fr. Edward Gaffney 8 Fr. Bernard Maguire ob. 1901 ; Bottom: A.D. 1889

Handwritten Caption: Top Row: 1. Mr. Alphonse Otis 2. Mr. Claude Roche 3. Mr. Andrew Brown 4. Mr. Joseph Raby 5. Mr. Daniel Lawton 6. Mr. Henry Maring 7 Mr. Emile Mattern 8. Mr. Henry Devine 9 Fr. William Power 10 Mr. Patrick Cronin 11 Mr. Ashton ; Bottom Row: Fr. Courtote 2. Fr. Anthony Free, ob. 1891 3. Fr. Aloysius Curioz. 4 Fr. David McKiniry 5 Fr. John O’Shanahan S.Mis. 6. Fr. Nicholas Davis 7 Fr. Edward Gaffney 8 Fr. Bernard Maguire ob. 1901 ; Bottom: A.D. 1889. (Photo courtesy Loyola University, in the Public Domain)

Picture from the Loyola University Library of a group of Jesuit priests and brothers. Given the other photos in the scrapbook that’s the source, the photos from Loyola University than the high school.

 

Holy Cross Band!

Band! Two unidentified photos from Holy Cross.

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This Franck photo, undated and unidentified, is captioned “Holy Cross College Orchestra”. The makeup of the group looks like a large jazz combo. The fashions here look like late 1920s/early 1930s.

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This photo, also from Franck Studios, looks like a classic brass band.

I’ll leave it to you Holy Cross folks to narrow down/identify these musicians.

Tad Gormley Stadium in City Park, 1941

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Friday Night Lights! From my book, Brothers of the Sacred Heart in New Orleans, this photo is from the St. Aloysius-Holy Cross game on November 6, 1941. By the time I was at Brother Martin in the 1970s, the serious rivalry between the schools had switched to basketball. Holy Cross dropped down in total enrollment in recent years, and the LHSAA would not let them “play up” in 5A athletics for several years, but the state association changed the rules, so now the “Catholic League” is once again an exciting district to follow.  (NOPL photo)