Canal Street 1958

Canal Street 1958

Canal Street 1958 is a view from the roof of the Jung Hotel.

canal street 1958

Canal Street 1958

Franck Studios photo of Canal Street, looking inbound towards the river. The Franck Studios photographer stands on the rooftop of the Jung Hotel, at 1500 Canal. Krauss Department Store stands in the 1201 block to the left, with the Hotel New Orleans in the 1300 block on the right. The Saenger Theater is across Basin Street from Krauss, with the iconic buildings of the 901 block (Audubon Building, Kress, and Maison Blanche) in the background, left. The studio shot this photo in 1958 or 1959.

Krauss in the 1950s

This photo offers a great view of the expansion progress of Krauss. The original store, built by Leon Fellman in 1903, consists of the two-story section fronting Canal Street. Fellman acquired the property in 1899. He built that first 2-story section and leased it to the Krauss Brothers. The brothers acquired the property behind the building, along Basin Street. In 1911, they built a five-story expansion. You can see the line/seam after four windows on each floor. Leon Heymann (the “Krauss Brother-in-Law”) built the third portion of the store in 1921. Heymann continued expanding the store until it filled the block between Canal and Iberville Streets.

Streetcars

While HNOC dates this picture at “approximately 1955,” the streetcar tracks narrow it down for us. Note the two-track configuration in the Canal Street neutral ground. With streetcar operation limited to Canal and St. Charles, the city ripped up the two outside tracks on Canal. The lines using those tracks had been converted to buses by 1948. So, Canal operated on the two tracks running from Liberty Place to City Park Avenue. One block of the inbound outside track remained, between Carondelet Street and St. Charles Avenue. St. Charles streetcars turned for their outbound run on that track.

The city planted the palm trees in this photo as part of the 1957 “beautification project.” They also built planter boxes along the neutral ground. Unfortunately, those palm trees only lasted about three years, because of a couple of cold winters.

Looking Down Canal, 1926

Looking Down Canal, 1926

Looking down Canal in 1926 reveals many of the buildings still standing on the city’s main street.

looking down canal

Looking down Canal

Canal Street, looking towards the river from the 1000 block. Franck Studios shot this photo between 1926 and 1929. The old-style lampposts on Canal Street date the photo prior to 1930. The poor condition of the neutral ground also indicates this was shot before the 1930 beautification program. To the left, the building at the corner of Canal and Burgundy in the 1001 block flows into the Audubon, Kress, and Maison Blanche buildings in the 901 block. On the right, the buildings of the 1000, 900, and 800 blocks flow together. Back to the left, the Godchaux Building stands prominently in the 500 block, with its cupola and rooftop water tower. An electric sign advertising the Orpheum Theater, hangs across the Canal Street.

The streetcars

Arch roof streetcars 821 and 813, operate on the N. Claiborne and St. Charles lines. St. Charles ran in belt service with Tulane at this time. The neutral ground held five tracks at this point. This enabled streetcars to connect and switch as needed at Rampart Street. The area between Rampart and Basin streets served as a busy terminal area, as various lines converged, offering riders connections to the railroad stations.The Canal/Esplanade cars, along with the West End line, operated on the inside tracks. Lines coming inbound to Canal popped up for a block, traveled the outside tracks for a block, then turned for their outbound runs. NOPSI discontinued and demolished all of the remaining 800-series streetcars in 1964.

While HNOC suggests the date at 1926 to 1929, the presence of streetcars narrows it down a bit. Since motormen and conductors struck NOPSI from July to October, 1929, this photo likely dates before that time.

Behind the first set of streetcars stand a set of “Palace” cars. These larger streetcars from the American Car Company, operated in belt service on Canal and Esplanade. The Palace cars also ran out to West End, on that line.

 

1929 Transit Strike #MBMonday

1929 Transit Strike #MBMonday

The 1929 transit strike in New Orleans snarled downtown traffic for over four months.

1929 Transit Strike

Photo of Canal Street, looking towards the river, July, 1929. The photographer stands at Canal and Rampart Streets, at the lake end of the 1000 block. The Audubon Building and Maison Blanche Department Store loom over the 901 block, on the left. A jitney bus, the light-colored vehicle in traffic on the right, offers what little service New Orleans Public Service, Incorporated (NOPSI) could offer, with all the streetcars locked up in their barns. The antenna tower above MB is the transmitter for WSMB Radio.

Empty neutral ground

Streetcars remained off the streets from July 1 to July 4th, 1929. NOPSI tried to run streetcars using strikebreakers on Saturday, July 5th, but picketers and their supporters wouldn’t allow the cars to exit the barns, after the first streetcar departed Canal Station. That streetcar rolled this route, down Canal Street, followed by a massive crowd. The strikers burned that streetcar when it reached the ferry terminal.

Maison Blanche 1929

The MB building was twenty-one years old at the time of the 1929 transit strike. This photographer captured two signs on the building. The store’s name runs vertically on the lake side of the building. The roof displays the store’s name and its tagline, “Greatest Store South” on the roof.

The MB building is about ten years old in this photo. Doctors, dentists, and other professionals occupied the office building. The transit strike created problems for those tenants. Without public transit, it was difficult to get to the doctor. While grandma would hop on the Desire line or the St. Charles-Tulane belt, no streetcars meant someone had to drive her to Maison Blanche. Look at that traffic on either side of the “Canal Street Zone.”

On the retail side, the lack of public transit put the hurt on the Canal Street stores. Marks Isaacs, D. H. Holmes, Maison Blanche, all the way up to Krauss Department Store. Again, look at that traffic. In that first week of July, 1929, the retailers were furious. That the strike continued for four months did permanent damage to NOPSI and public transit in New Orleans.

 

Palace Car Damage

Palace Car Damage

The 1929 transit car strike left a lot of Palace car damage.

palace car damage

Palace car damage

Photo of New Orleans Public Service, Incorporated (NOPSI) streetcar 625, an American Car Company “Palace” streetcar, photographed on 2-July-1929, showing damage by vandals. The motormen and conductors operating the city’s streetcars struck NOPSI on 1-July-1929. Those workers inflicted a great deal of damage to streetcars, tracks, and stations overnight, 30-June/1-July, and into 2-July. This photo, taken by Franck Studios, is part of a series documenting that damage for NOPSI’s lawyers. NOPSI 625’s roll board indicates it last operated on the West End line, likely on 30-June. The operator parked the streetcar at Canal Station. That station stood on the original site of the New Orleans City Railroad Company’s car and mule barns, built in 1861. By the 1920s, several of the original buildings remained. The public notices like the one tacked up on the end of the streetcar went out on 11-July-1929, so that may specifically date this photo.

The 1929 Strike

The Amalgamated Association of Street and Electric Railway Employees of America, Division No. 194, negotiated with transit managers for NOPSI for several years, in the run-up to 1-July-1929. Talks broke down that Summer, and the union called for a strike. The motormen and conductors took destructive actions overnight. They vandalized a number of streetcars, particular at Canal Station, along with track on Canal Street. They also vandalized the station itself.

While the story of the invention/creation of the po-boy sandwich offers a romanticized version of the four months of the strike. It’s clear, however, that the circumstances were anything but romantic. While the violence of the first two days of the strike subsided, it picked up again by 5-July. NOPSI decided not to operate any streetcars from 1-4 July.

On 5-July-1929, NOPSI brought in strike-breakers in an attempt to restore streetcar service. One Palace streetcar departed Canal Station that Saturday morning. Crowds of union members and their supporters blocked Canal Station and the other streetcar barns after that first streetcar left. The lone streetcar traveled down Canal Street to Liberty Place. The crowd followed it, eventually surrounding the car. They pulled the strike breakers off the car and set it on fire.

 

Canal Lakeshore Bus

Canal Lakeshore Bus

The Canal Lakeshore bus took over for the West End line.

canal lakeshore bus

Canal Lakeshore bus

Photo of Canal Street, showing Flxible buses operating on the various “Canal Street” lines, after the conversion of the Canal line to buses in 1964. NOPSI cut back streetcar operations on Canal Street to a single block, on what was the inbound outside track. Arch roof streetcars on the St. Charles line, like the one in the photo. I can’t make out which of the 35 remaining 1923-vintage streetcars makes the turn on the left side. If you can sort it out, let me know. The photographer stands in the “Canal Street Zone,” just on the river side of St. Charles Avenue.

Post-streetcar Canal buses

The official name for the line NOPSI 314 rolls on in this photo is, “Canal – Lakeshore via Pontchartrain Boulevard.” Here’s the route.

Outbound

  • Canal Street and the river
  • “Canal Street Zone” lakebound to Claiborne Avenue
  • Merge into auto lanes at Claiborne, continue outbound to City Park Avenue
  • Left turn at City Park Avenue
  • Right Turn at West End Blvd.
  • Left turn under the Pontchartrain Expressway (later I-10) overpass at Metairie Road.
  • Right turn onto Pontchartrain Boulevard
  • Continue outbound on Pontchartrain Boulevard
  • Right-turn on Fleur-de-lis Avenue (prior to I-10)
  • Curve around on Pontchartrain Blvd, go under I-10, continue to Fleur-de-Lis. Left turn onto Fleur-de-Lis. (after I-10)
  • Lakebound on Fleur-de-Lis to Veterans
  • Right on Veterans to West End Blvd.
  • Left on West End to Robert E. Lee Blvd. (Now Allen Toussant Blvd.)
  • Right on Toussaint to Canal Blvd.
  • Left on Canal Blvd to bus terminal at the lake.

INBOUND

  • Depart Canal Blvd terminal, riverbound.
  • Right turn on Toussaint to Pontchartrain Blvd.
  • Pontchartrain Blvd to Veterans, right turn on Veterans
  • Left turn on Fleur-de-Lis
  • Fleur-de-Lis back to Pontchartrain Blvd.
  • Pontchartrain Blvd to City Park Avenue
  • Left on City Park Avenue, the right onto Canal Street
  • Canal Street, riverbound to the river.

This route, was one of the main killers of the Canal streetcars. Air-conditioning all the way into town. No change from West End to the streetcar at City Park Avenue.

Canal buses in the 1970s

By the time I rode the Canal buses in the 1970s, on my way to and from Brother Martin, I could hop on any of the three Canal lines, to get to City Park Avenue. Canal Cemeteries ended at City Park Avenue. Canal-Lake Vista and Canal-Lakeshore split there, but all I needed was to get to the outbound Veterans bus.

 

Canal Street Postcard

Canal Street Postcard

This Canal Street Postcard was printed in 1903.

canal street postcard

Canal Street postcard

Detroit Publishing Company postcard of Canal Street, New Orleans, from 1903. The photographer stands on the roof of the Custom House, looking towards the lake. The foreground shows the 500 block. The round coupla, foreground right, sits atop the Godchaux Building, at Canal and Chartres Streets. Further up the street, the postcard shows the often-overlooked buildings of the 600 block. The top of the Church of the Immaculate Conception (Jesuits Church) is visible, background, center. Streetcars scurry up and down the two main-line tracks at the center, with other lines appearing and disappearing on the outside tracks.

The Henry Clay monument now stands in Lafayette Square, across from City Hall (now Gallier Hall). The city re-located the monument there in 1901. Canal streetcars passed so close to the monument, there were concerns about safety.

While the postcard gets incredibly grainy after the 700 block, the cupola of Leon Fellman’s store at 800 Canal, and the Chess, Checkers, and Whist Club at 900 Canal, are visible.

Vicarious living

Detroit Publishing Company knew living vicariously through postcards was a popular pastime. The company bought images from photographers across the country. They then hired artists to color the black-and-white photos in. Now, photographers just have to post their work on social media.

The Streetcars

Electrification of streetcar lines began in 1893. Canal Street electrified in 1895. So, this 1905 photo shows first-generation electric streetcars. The engineering firm, Ford, Bacon, and Davis pitched a design to streetcar operators for a single-truck platform in 1894. Most of the streetcars in this photo are of that design. Most of these streetcars move riders on the inside tracks. One single-truck on the Uptown side turns from Camp Street on to Canal. The operator prepares to travel one block, then make another right-turn, onto Magazine Street. The now-immortal arch roof streetcars are still twelve years away. They made their first appearance on the streets in 1915.