NORTA 2007 #StreetcarSaturday

NORTA 2007 is a 2000-series Von Dullen arch roof streetcar.

norta 2007

NORTA 2007 on the Riverfront

A Von Dullen streetcar, NORTA 2007, operating on the Riverfront line, 10-June-2019. Photo by/courtesy of Michelle Callahan. While the 400-series streetcars, built in 1997, operated on Riverfront, after the line’s expansion, the 2000-series operating on Canal Street often turned left as they reached the river. They ran on Riverfront, from Canal to the French Market. So, it was often possible to catch a streetcar at the Old US Mint and ride it all the way to the Cemeteries Terminal, at Canal Street and City Park Avenue.

2000 differences

NORTA designed the 400-series Riverfront streetcars to be as close to the vintage-1923 arch roofs as possible. The Americans with Disabilities Act required accessible operation on Riverfront. So, NORTA retired the streetcars running on the line since 1988. They built new arch roofs that included wheelchair lifts on either side of the cars. The stops along Riverfront allowed wheelchair users to come right up to the side. The operator stops, lowers the lift, secures the passenger, and off they go.

While the 400s are not air-conditioned, the 2000s are. That’s why they have the faux monitor deck on top. The design is that of an arch roof. The aesthetics are challenged, though. The air-conditioning unit, as well as the electronics package sit on the car’s roof. They make for unsightly bumps. So, Von Dullen modified the design. When you’re inside a 2000, it’s clear you’re in an arch roof. From the outside, the faux deck masks the modern stuff.

Along the riverfront

In this wonderful photo, NORTA 2007 passes in front of the Jackson Brewing Company’s former facility, at Decatur and St. Peter Streets. The area along the river, from Canal Street to the Governor Nicholls Street Wharf, was converted into a pedestrian walk in the 1980s. This was expanded to add Woldenburg Park in the 1990s. The Riverfront streetcar line uses the old Louisville and Nashville Railroad right-of-way to transport passengers from the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center to the French Market.

Krauss Warehouse Building #KraussFriday

Krauss Warehouse Building #KraussFriday

Krauss warehouse building on Iberville Street supported the store.

krauss warehouse

Krauss warehouse building

The Krauss Company used this seven-story building at 201 N. Front Street (Front and Iberville) as warehouse space in the 1930s to the 1960s. The store, located at 1201 Canal, was only in the block between Canal and Iberville at the time. The building was originally part of the Louisiana Sugar Exchange complex, until that business closed in the 1930s. The photo is undated, but the Frank Studios woody at the bottom right places it in the early 1950s.

Molasses

The Louisiana Sugar Exchange stood on Iberville and Front Streets from 1883ish until the early 1930s. The seven-story warehouse stood next to a ten-story “filter house.” Sugar syrup required filtration to remove impurities. Large plants use gravity to filter the product. Once the syrup was filtered, the plants processed it. They barreled the product as molasses, storing it in the warehouse. Molasses was easy to ship.

By the 1930s, sugar producers moved away from downtown New Orleans. They built larger processing facilities up or down the river. The filter house and warehouse stood unused.

Leon Heymann and Krauss

Krauss Department Store opened on Canal Street in 1903. The company expanded from the original two stories in 1911, adding a five-story extension. Leon Heymann, President of the Krauss company (and brother-in-law to the original four Krauss brothers) eventually acquired the entire 1201 block of Canal Street, back to Iberville. He then acquired the block behind the store, from Iberville to Bienville Streets. While he planned a service/warehouse building for that second block, World War II slowed that down. The second building didn’t happen until 1952. So, the warehouse space down by the river was an important part of the business.

Into the 1960s

The Krauss Company sold the 201 N. Front building after the completion of the service building behind the store. The 201 N. front building changed hands a few times in the 1960s and 1970s. Folks may remember the building as the location of “Victoria Station,” a train-themed restaurant where diners ate in railcars (as well as in the building).

One11 Hotel

The old warehouse building now houses the One11 Hotel, and its Batture Bistro and Bar.

Hat-tips

This photo is via HNOC. Tip of the hat to Mike Scott for his 2020 article about the building in Da Paper.

USS Cayuga 1862

USS Cayuga 1862

USS Cayuga participated in Farragut’s attack on Forts Jackson and St. Phillip.

uss cayuga

USS Cayuga

An Unadilla-class gunboat, Cayuga was launched on 10-Oct-1861, at Portland, CT. After final fitting-out at the New York Navy Yard, she was commissioned on 21-Feb-1862. Upon commissioning, the Navy ordered Cayuga to Ship Island. The gunboat joined the West Gulf Blockading Squadron. Flag-Officer (later Rear Admiral) David Farragut commanded that squadron. Cayuga was one of nine Unadilla-class gunboats in the squadron. After the rebel army abandoned New Orleans to Farragut and Butler, Cayuga remained in the squadron, moving north to support operations as Union forces secured the Southern portion of the Mississippi River.

Unadillas

Farragut’s nine Unadilla-class gunboats engaged rebel boats along the river at Forts Jackson and St. Phillip. They were:

  • Cayuga
  • Itasca
  • Katahdin
  • Kennebec
  • Kineo
  • Pinola
  • Sciota
  • Winona
  • Wissahickon

The rebel defenders extended chains across the river, from one fort to the other. On 20-April-1862, Farragut ordered three of the Unadillas up the river to clear those chains. They opened a passage on the west side of the river. Farragut moved the rest of his squadron, including Cayuga, up through this opening.

While Porter’s mortar-vessels pounded the forts, Cayuga and the other gunboats blasted a path for the larger ships in the squadron. Cayuga and the other five gunboats that cleared the forts anchored in the river at New Orleans. Their firepower compelled the surrender of the city. So, the gunboats threatened New Orleans with flooding. Their guns could take aim at the city’s levee system. City leaders knew the impact crevasses would have.

Theodorus Bailey

Captain Theodorus Bailey held command of Colorado, 19, as part of the West Gulf Blockade Squadron. Bailey and Colorado enjoyed success off the Louisiana and Mississippi coasts in the early months of 1862. He was, however, unable to bring Colorado up the river. While Colorado was a significant asset, the frigate’s draft was too deep. So, Farragut transferred Bailey from Colorado to Cayuga for the attack. Bailey commanded a division of three gunboats. He successfully brought Cayuga into the Port of New Orleans. On 25-April-1862, Farragut ordered Bailey to enter the city. He and Lieutenant George Perkins, USN, went to City Hall, where their surrender demands were rebuffed.

The Image

This image appeared in Battles and leaders of the Civil War : being for the most part contributions by Union and Confederate officers, Volume 2, 1887.

Birds-eye view 1851

Birds-eye view 1851

Birds-eye view of New Orleans, 1851, by John Bachmann.

birds-eye view 1851

Click the image for hi-res copy

Birds-eye view 1851

“Birds’ eye view of New-Orleans / drawn from nature on stone by J. Bachman [i.e., Bachmann].” The Mississippi River stands in the foreground. The view looks north to Lake Pontchartrain. Below the title: “Published by the agents A. Guerber & Co., c1851 (Printed by J. Bachman [i.e., Bachmann]).”

The map features an incredible amount of detail. While the majority of the map focuses on the east bank of the river, scenes on the west bank are visible. Reply/comment with the details that stand out to you!

Bachmann’s maps

John Bachmann, Sr., was a lithographer from Switzerland. While most of his work features views of New York City, he made a number of lithographs in other cities. Students of the Southern Rebellion refer to his drawings regularly. Anticipating conflict, Bachmann traveled to a number of possible flashpoints. He sketched those scenes, then converted them to “aerial” views.

Creating a birds-eye view

The perspective of drawings like birds-eye view 1851 dates back centuries. The idea is, the artist surveys and sketches the scene from a ground-level perspective. They then “stretch” the scene in their imagination. The artist uses that mental image to “look down” on the scene. They review the original details, adjusting the perspective.

So, to draw those riverboats, Bachmann sketched them, most likely sitting on the west bank levee. He added them to the river on the birds-eye, adjusting the angle in his mind. The paralell riverboat now appears from above.

New Orleans detail

Several things stand out to me from this litho:

  • Riverboats. Bachmann captures a number of ocean-going ships as well as the classic riverboats that traveled up and down the Mississippi. The Port of New Orleans bustled in the late 1840s/early 1850s.
  • Old Canal. The Carondelet Canal runs on the Eastern side of the lithograph, merging with Bayou St. John. The bayou then extends to the lake. The left-right body of water visible where canal joins bayou is Bayou Metairie. The city closed the Carondelet Canal in the 1920s. Norman C. Francis Parkway comes to and end in what was the swampy ground joining the bayous.

We’ll return to this drawing again for more detail!

Unloading Coffee 1900

Unloading Coffee 1900

Unloading Coffee is the subject of a ca. 1900 postcard.

unloading coffee

Unloading Coffee

Longshoremen unloading coffee from a freighter at the Port of New Orleans. Detroit Publishing Company postcard, ca 1900-1909. From the 1890s to the 1970s, New Orleans received over 80% of coffee imports into the United States. Freighters traveled from ports in Colombia to the docks along the New Orleans riverfront. The city continues to play an important role in the coffee trade. You can still smell the roasting coffee from the Folger’s plant, along the Industrial Canal.

NOLA and the coffee trade

Aside from occasional disruptions due to tropical cyclones, New Orleans earned the nickname, “logical port” for goods originating in Latin America. This reference, dates back prior to the Southern Rebellion. So, that pre-dates the Panama Canal. Shipments Bananas and other produce from Central America and coffee from South America grew throughout the pre-rebellion period.

New Orleans established an extensive transportation infrastructure. Coffee growers delivered their product to ports in Colombia. Bags of coffee took ship, traveling across the Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico. Ships unloading coffee in New Orleans turned around quickly. Once in New Orleans, coffee brokers bought the beans from the shippers. The brokers then sold the beans to coffee sellers. Those businesses bought the beans and created blends. They roasted, bagged, and sold those blends to consumers.

Coffee brokers

As the coffee trade grew, brokers lined Magazine Street. One of the most influential coffee brokers was Jacob Aron. Aron founded his company in 1898. They operated from 336 Magazine Street. So, that location is now the St. James Hotel.

Riverfront New Orleans

This postcard, taken between 1900 and 1909, shows the riverfront on the Uptown side of Canal Street. The Mississippi River curves around Algiers Point in the background. While this part of the riverfront thrived for decades, the Riverwalk Marketplace and Ernest N. Morial Convention Center now occupy this area.

Photo via the Curt Teich Postcard Archives Digital Collection of the Newberry Library.

NOPSI 924 becomes NORTA 450 #StreetcarSaturday

NOPSI 924 becomes NORTA 450 #StreetcarSaturday

NOPSI 924 came home as NORTA 450 on the Riverfront line.

NOPSI 924

NOPSI 924

From my book, New Orleans: The Canal Streetcar Line (2004), NOPSI 924 sits at Carrollton Station. The streetcar operated on the Riverfront line until 1997. The New Orleans Regional Transit Authority (NORTA) numbered it 450. They retired 450 when the line was expanded. A group called Bring Our Streetcars Home acquired the streetcar in 1988. They gave it to NORTA. The transit authority refurbished the car. They painted it red and yellow.

Riverfront service

NORTA established the first new streetcar line in New Orleans in a century in 1988. The Riverfront line operated on an unused track owned by the former Louisville and Nashville Railroad. L&N offered passenger service to New Orleans for decades. It continues freight service as part of CSX Transportation. The L&N passenger terminal stood at the foot of Canal Street, near the ferry terminal. While L&N passenger service moved to Union Passenger Terminal in 1954, the tracks remained.

So, NORTA restored the track, replacing much of the rails. They built a “passing siding.” The siding allowed a streetcar going in one direction to wait so a streetcar traveling in the opposite direction could pass.

Riverfront operated five streetcars. Bring Our Streetcars Home found three 1923-vintage arch roof cars. NORTA put them into service. These streetcars didn’t have wheelchair access. They acquired two Melbourne W-2 cars with center doors. Those streetcars could accommodate wheelchairs.

1997 Upgrades

The Americans with Disabilities Act became law in 1990. When NORTA upgraded Riverfront to two-track operation, the line lost its “grandfather” status with respect to ADA. That meant all of the streetcars on the line had to be wheelchair-accessible. Rather than cut holes in the sides of the arch roofs, the authority built new streetcars in the arch roof style. Those 400-series streetcars continue to operate on Riverfront, and occasionally on the Canal line.

NOPSI 924/NORTA 450 continues to languish at Carrollton Station, seventeen years after this photo was taken.

Thanks to Aaron for sharing the memory on Facebook!