Twelve Months New Orleans July

Twelve Months New Orleans July

Twelve Months New Orleans July, continuing the series by Enrique Alferez

twelve months new orleans july

Twelve Months New Orleans July

This image is the seventh in a series of images by Enrique Alferez, published by Michael Higgins as “The Twelve Months of New Orleans.” Higgins published the illustrations in 1940. The image features an outdoor procession, part of the celebration of the Catholic Feast of Corpus Christi.

Enrique Alferez

Alferez was born in Northern Mexico on May 4, 1901. He studied at the Art Institute of Chicago from 1927 to 1929. He came to New Orleans in 1929. Alferez made New Orleans his home. He took advantage of various Works Progress Administration grants in the late 1930s. Alferez created a number of sculptures in the metro area, particularly in New Orleans City Park. Additionally, he designed the large fountain in front of Shushan Airport (now New Orleans Lakefront Airport.

Alferez drew and painted, as well as sculpting. So, he included many New Orleans landmarks in the “Twelve Months” booklet.

Twelve Months

Twelve Months New Orleans January

The title/cover page of the booklet says:

The
Twelve Months
of
New Orleans

A set of 12 Romantic
Lithographic Prints
In COLORS
Displaying 60 local subjects
drawn direct on the plate
with pen, brush, and crayon
by
Enrique Alferez

Printed and published by Michael Higgins
at 303 North Peters St
NEW ORLEANS

July’s Lithograph

Independence Day and flags are the themes of July’s illustration.

The Flags

While the lithographs in this series so far feature a main drawing in the center, and smaller ones in each corner, the Ten Flags line up in two vertical rows for July. The flags are (text from the litho in bold):

  1. Castile and Leon, carried by De Soto. In the course of his westward explorations, Hernando De Soto reached the Mississippi River on 8-May-1541.
  2. Royal France, planted by La Salle, 1682. This flag symbolized the rule of France over Colonial Louisiana until the Seven Year’s War.
  3. Bourbon Spain, 1769. France ceded Louisiana to Spain, to avoid having to surrender the territory to the British. This arguably should be 1762, but Spain didn’t immediately send a governor.
  4. British Union Jack, 1763. The British briefly occupied Baton Rouge, until Spanish Governor Galvez dislodged them. This date is incorrect, as Galvez did not become governor until 1777, and this incident took place in 1779.
  5. US takes over, 1803. Louisiana becomes the twelfth state in 1812.
  6. Lone Star of West Florida, 1810. Americans seized Baton Rouge from a British encampment, declaring the “Florida Parishes” independend. US President James Madison annexed the territory in 1810, adding it to the overall Louisiana Territory.
  7. National flag of Louisiana, 1861. Flag flown in Louisiana after secession and before joining the CSA.
  8. Confederate Naval Jack. This flag flew over Louisiana (other than New Orleans) from 1861 to 1865. Its use in New Orleans ended on May 1, 1862.

Flags 9 and 10 are those of the French Republic and the United States. The flag of France briefly flew over New Orleans, during the transition from Spanish control back to the French, as part of the Louisiana Purchase process. The American flag shown is the 48-star version, from 1940.

Independence Day

The central component of the litho is a sword, wrapped in a banner that says, “The Twelve Months of New Orleans – July – The Ten Flags.

See you for the eighth image in August.

 

Twelve Months New Orleans June

Twelve Months New Orleans June

Twelve Months New Orleans June, continuing the series by Enrique Alferez

twelve months new orleans june

Twelve Months New Orleans June

This image is the sixth in a series of images by Enrique Alferez, published by Michael Higgins as “The Twelve Months of New Orleans.” Higgins published the illustrations in 1940. The image features an outdoor procession, part of the celebration of the Catholic Feast of Corpus Christi.

Enrique Alferez

Alferez was born in Northern Mexico on May 4, 1901. He studied at the Art Institute of Chicago from 1927 to 1929. He came to New Orleans in 1929. Alferez made New Orleans his home. He took advantage of various Works Progress Administration grants in the late 1930s. Alferez created a number of sculptures in the metro area, particularly in New Orleans City Park. Additionally, he designed the large fountain in front of Shushan Airport (now New Orleans Lakefront Airport.

Alferez drew and painted, as well as sculpting. So, he included many New Orleans landmarks in the “Twelve Months” booklet.

Twelve Months

Twelve Months New Orleans January

The title/cover page of the booklet says:

The
Twelve Months
of
New Orleans

A set of 12 Romantic
Lithographic Prints
In COLORS
Displaying 60 local subjects
drawn direct on the plate
with pen, brush, and crayon
by
Enrique Alferez

Printed and published by Michael Higgins
at 303 North Peters St
NEW ORLEANS

June’s Lithograph

Summertime/outdoor activities and are the themes for June.

The Corners

Top Left: Voodoo. June 23 is St. John’s Eve, the day before the Feast of St. John, on the Catholic Church’s liturgical calendar. St. John’s Eve is a significant night for practitioners of Voudon. The Voudon would go out to Bayou St. John and the lake, performing rituals and asking favor of the Loa, beginning at sunset. Additionally, modern Wiccans and other Pagans mark St. John’s Eve, as part of their Midsummer rituals.

Top Right: Lee Memorial

The Lost Cause of the Confederacy remained a significant part of the culture of New Orleans as late as the 1940s. While there’s no one particular event related to Lee or the (now-removed) monument in June, Lee Circle served as an escape. Downtown residents and workers sought refuge and relaxation in the green space of the circle.

Bottom Left: Jefferson Davis, only President of the Confederate States of America, was born on 3-June-1808. So, New Orleans marked the occasion with a ceremony. The illustration features the location of that ceremony, the Davis statue, formerly located on the corner of Canal Street and Jefferson Davis Parkway. The city re-named that parkway in 2021, for Dr. Norman C. Francis.

Bottom Right: “Lakeshore Lilies” – not flowers, but rather young ladies enjoying the sea breeze along Lakeshore Drive.

Summer Observances

The Catholic Church is fond of large, outdoor celebrations, in the 18th and 19th Centuries. While earlier processions wound around entire towns, parishes with long French or Spanish traditions, continued those outdoor celebrations.

The Feast of Corpus Christi began in Belgium in the 13th Century. Priests paraded the Eucharist around the town in a grand procession. Popes endorsed and encouraged this feast day. Naturally, the tradition carried over to French-Spanish Colonial New Orleans. By the mid-20th Century, the processions were no longer citywide. Parishes processed the Eucharist around their own neighborhoods.

The drawing shows a large Corpus Christi procession. So, a bishop (perhaps the archbishop?) carries the Blessed Sacrament in a monstrance. The monstrance is a large gold receptacle for the consecrated host. Additionally, he is accompanied by acolytes carrying a canopy. That canopy protects both bishop and Eucharist. Two men, dressed in Colonial-style costume, observe the procession from horseback. The caption reads, simply, “Corpus Christi Procession.”

See you for the seventh image in July.

 

Cabildo Courtyard 1940

Cabildo Courtyard 1940

Cabildo courtyard, captured in a 1940 postcard.

Cabildo courtyard

“Courtyard and Prison Rooms in the Cabildo.” This postcard, from the Curt Teich Postcard Archives Digital Collection at the Newberry Library, University of Illinois, is from a photo by Bill Leeper. It features the Cabildo, the building that housed the seat of the Spanish Colonial government in New Orleans. While the original government building was destroyed in the Great Fire of 1788, this building replaced it. The Spanish government completed the Cabildo in 1799. The United States took ownership of the Cabildo in 1803, as part of the Louisiana Purchase.

Louisiana State Museum

After serving as the seat of the Louisiana Supreme Court, the Cabildo became the home of the Louisiana State Museum in 1911. As such, the building housed a number of exhibits. Since the Cabildo is an exhibit in itself, there’s usually some sort of display/exhibition that brings visitors back to the Colonial period. The courtyard played that role in 1940.

The courtyard and the “prison”

This postcard captures the courtyard behind the Cabildo. Outdoor space is a common feature in the architecture of Spanish Colonial buildings. Homes were built around a central courtyard. The open space allowed heat to rise out through the central space, and let the breeze come in.

The courtyard at the Cabildo differs from others in the Vieux Carré. It appears to be open space surrounded by the Cabildo, but it’s really two buildings. The structure in the rear of the photo is the Louisiana State Armory, commonly known as the Arsenal. The Spanish built their arsenal on this spot. In addition to holding weapons and ammunition, the Arsenal included jail cells. So, that’s how the postcard gets its title. The Americans remodeled the Arsenal in 1839. The street entrance on St. Peter Street received a Greek Revival entrance, but the interior retained the Spanish style.

Friends of the Cabildo

The Louisiana State Museum uses the Arsenal as an extension of the Cabildo’s museum space. There’s a large meeting room on the second floor. This morning, I had the privilege of speaking to the Tour Guides of the Friends of the Cabildo, at their monthly meeting. The meeting was via Zoom. Before the pandemic, the tour guides met on the second floor of the Arsenal. I look forward to my next talk to the group, back in this wonderful building.

Twelve Months New Orleans May

Twelve Months New Orleans May

Twelve Months New Orleans May, continuing the series by Enrique Alferez

twelve months new orleans may

Twelve Months New Orleans May

This image is the Fourth in a series of images by Enrique Alferez, published by Michael Higgins as “The Twelve Months of New Orleans.” Higgins published the illustrations in 1940. The image features dancers celebrating April’s spring festivals.

Enrique Alferez

Alferez was born in Northern Mexico on May 4, 1901. He studied at the Art Institute of Chicago from 1927 to 1929. He came to New Orleans in 1929. Alferez made New Orleans his home. He took advantage of various Works Progress Administration grants in the late 1930s. Alferez created a number of sculptures in the metro area, particularly in New Orleans City Park. He also designed the large fountain in front of Shushan Airport (now New Orleans Lakefront Airport.

Alferez drew and painted, as well as sculpting. He included many New Orleans landmarks in the “Twelve Months” booklet.

Twelve Months

Twelve Months New Orleans January

The title/cover page of the booklet says:

The
Twelve Months
of
New Orleans

A set of 12 Romantic
Lithographic Prints
In COLORS
Displaying 60 local subjects
drawn direct on the plate
with pen, brush, and crayon
by
Enrique Alferez

Printed and published by Michael Higgins
at 303 North Peters St
NEW ORLEANS

May’s Lithograph

Outdoor activities and springtime are the themes for May.

The Corners

Top Left: McDonogh Day. On May 7th, the city recognized the contributions to Orleans Parish by Baltimore philanthropist John McDonogh. Numerous schools were named after McDonogh. African-American students and teachers staged a massive boycott of the Lafayette Square ceremony in 1954.

Top Right: Cotton Carnival

While the New Orleans Cotton Carnival was not as big as the event in Memphis, it was cause for (another) spring celebration.

Bottom Left: The State Legislature opened in May in the 1940s. Over time, that start date was pushed forward, into April. The corner features a sketch of the state capitol building in Baton Rouge.

Bottom Right: Livestock and Poultry shows. More cause to get out in the nice weather!

Springtime Activity

While farmers proceeded with spring planting, fishermen and trappers used their small, flat-bottomed boats, known as pirogues, to ply their trades. There was always a rivalry between men on the bayous, boasting their boat was faster. No better way to decide than a race!

In MAY, the Trappers
and Fishermen of the bayous
hold their annual
Pirogue Race

See you for the sixth image in June.

 

Bagur Southern Souvenier Postcard

Bagur Southern Souvenier Postcard

The Bagur Southern Souvenir Company produced postcards of New Orleans.

bagur southern

Bagur Southern Souvenir

“Greetings from New Orleans” postcard, published by the Dexter Press company, of Pearl River, NY. Bagur Southern Souvenir Company sold a wide range of products. They hold the rights to the “Aunt Sally” logo for “Creole Pralines.”

Curt Teich created this style of postcard. His company produced hundreds of “Greetings postcards.”

Greetings from New Orleans

Curt Teich, a German, immigrated to the United States in 1895. He opened a print shop in 1899. Teich produced linen postcards. Beginning in 1931, Teich produced a line of color postcards saying, “Greetings From…” He published postcards featuring hundreds of locations across the United States.

Businesses selling souvenirs snapped up Teich’s postcards. Travelers purchased the postcards to document family trips. The postcards continued in popularity until the Interstate Highway System dominated auto travel in the 1950s. Interstate highways bypassed the small towns and shops that sold Teich’s Cards. Stops consisted of gas stations and restaurants immediately off of the highway, rather than passing through towns.

Curt Teich passed away in 1974. He was 96. The family donated their collection of postcards to the Lake County Discovery Museum in Libertyville, Illinois. The museum transferred the collection to the Newberry Library in Chicago. The collection at The Newberry consists of over 500,000 unique postcard designs. This postcard came to the Newberry from the Bagur shop in the French Market.

Pralines and Souvenirs

The Bagur family began their candy business in the 1910s. They added pralines to the product line in the 1930s. The business moved into the French Market at that time. The Aunt Sally’s shop operates there to this day. So, Bagur Southern owns the shop, presenting the iconic figure out front.

It comes as no surprise that a candy shop in the French Market sold  souvenirs. While postcard sales aren’t what they used to be, Teich’s New Orleans postcard no doubt did well at Aunt Sally’s.

Twelve Months New Orleans April

Twelve Months New Orleans April

Twelve Months New Orleans April, continuing the series by Enrique Alferez

twelve months new orleans april

Twelve Months New Orleans April

This image is the Fourth in a series of images by Enrique Alferez, published by Michael Higgins as “The Twelve Months of New Orleans.” Higgins published the illustrations in 1940. The image features dancers celebrating April’s spring festivals.

Enrique Alferez

Alferez was born in Northern Mexico on May 4, 1901. He studied at the Art Institute of Chicago from 1927 to 1929. He came to New Orleans in 1929. Alferez made New Orleans his home. He took advantage of various Works Progress Administration grants in the late 1930s. Alferez created a number of sculptures in the metro area, particularly in New Orleans City Park. He also designed the large fountain in front of Shushan Airport (now New Orleans Lakefront Airport.

Alferez drew and painted, as well as sculpting. He included many New Orleans landmarks in the “Twelve Months” booklet.

Twelve Months

Twelve Months New Orleans January

The title/cover page of the booklet says:

The
Twelve Months
of
New Orleans

A set of 12 Romantic
Lithographic Prints
In COLORS
Displaying 60 local subjects
drawn direct on the plate
with pen, brush, and crayon
by
Enrique Alferez

Printed and published by Michael Higgins
at 303 North Peters St
NEW ORLEANS

April’s Lithograph

Mardi Gras is over and March is all about Spring and Lent.

The Corners

Top Left: Baseball Opens. Baseball, featuring the New Orleans Pelicans. The border for the illustration includes baseballs and bats.

Top Right: N.O. Horse Show. Plantations and farms around New Orleans bred and raced horses for centuries. That culture continued into the 1940s. The New Orleans Horse Show featured the finest of local horses.

Bottom Left: “Flower Shows.” After Lent, every blooming flower offered an excuse for a show or festival. Competition between growers of specific varietals was intense.

Bottom Right: “Lovers in the Park” – Sitting out under a clear sky and full moon! Even before Daylight Saving Time, couples enjoyed Audubon and City Parks in the evening.

Music and Dance

Easter Sunday broke the solemnity of Lent and Holy Week. Springtime bloomed, warmed, and excited New Orleanians. That meant hot jazz! Alferez recognized our desire to snap our fingers and dance. He presents a couple dancing to a jazz trio of drums, trumpet and trombone. Alferez captions the image:

April
has
many
MUSIC
Festivals
Sweet
and
Hot,
White
and
Colored

See you for the fifth image in May.