Marigny Mobile Connection 1854

Marigny Mobile Connection 1854

Below is a sneak peek of this content!

Marigny Mobile Connection 1854 - linking New Orleans to Mobile, AL Marigny Mobile Connection 1854 It's a technique that, for the most part, Google Maps rendered obsolete. You've got an idea. You pull out a map. You outline your idea on the map. This is essentially what the Marigny Mobile Connection 1854 presents. Someone suggested, "Hey, how about we connect...
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Texas and Pacific’s Route of the Eagles in the 1950s #TrainThursday

Texas and Pacific’s Route of the Eagles in the 1950s #TrainThursday

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Route of the Eagles in the 1950s included the Louisiana Eagle Route of the Eagles The Texas and Pacific Railway operated two passenger trains named "Eagles." This route map was printed on the back of T&P tickets around 1950. The bottom of the ticket displays an F-7 locomotive (A-B configuration), along with baggage, dome, and coach cars. The Eagles used...
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Amtrak Northbound Advertisement 1984 #TrainThursday

Amtrak Northbound Advertisement 1984 #TrainThursday

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Amtrak Northbound Advertisement 1984 in the Loyola Maroon Amtrak Northbound Advertisement 1984 Ad in the Loyola Maroon, 3-February-1984, promoting travel to Jackson, MS and Memphis, TN, by train. The route isn't mentioned in the ad, but one travels to Jackson and Memphis on the "City of New Orleans." Amtrak acquired the route from the Illinois Central Railroad when passenger travel...
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Milneburg 1927 – Pontchartrain Railroad

Milneburg 1927 – Pontchartrain Railroad

Milneburg 1927, and the Orleans Levee Board

milneburg 1927

Milneburg 1927

Photo of what is now the intersection of Elysian Fields Avenue and Robert E. Boulevard, 4-March-1927. Photo shot by an unidentified photographer for the Orleans Levee Board.

The Orleans Levee Board shot a lot of film in the late 1920s in Milneburg. They prepared for land reclamation projects in the area. This shot, shows how far the lake shoreline extended south. The levee at the time blocked the lake at what is now Robert E. Lee Boulevard. So, with the tracks running the length of what is now Elysian Fields Avenue, pinpointing this photo is not difficult.

Milneburg reclamation

Land reclamation in Milneburg began in the Fall of 1927. The process involved building barriers in the water, then pumping out the water behind the barrier. When the water was gone, move the barrier out further, drain that. Keep going until pumping the water wasn’t practical. By mid-1928, reclamation advanced to the lighthouse. So, in modern terms, reclamation started at Robert E. Lee, advanced to Leon C. Simon, and terminated at what is now Lakeshore Drive. So, the lighthouse ends up in the middle of the Pontchartrain Beach Amusement park. Now, it’s right next to the UNO Hotel, Restaurant and Tourism school.

The railroad

The Pontchartrain Railroad diminished dramatically in the mid-1920s. Milneburg’s usefulness as a commercial port facility declined after the Southern Rebeilion. By the 1880s, the railroad, along with restaurants and hotels in the area, re-branded. They sold the ride out to the lake as a day trip or overnight entertainment excursion. While the re-branding was successful for about twenty years, the area lost its attractiveness. Fishing camps dominated the Milneburg landscape in the 1920s. The railroad connected those camps with the city. The railroad’s profitability dropped.

The reference to “L&N tracks” on the photo goes to ownership. The Louisville & Nashville Railroad acquired the Pontchartrain Railroad in the mid-1880s.

cross-posted to Pontchartrain Railroad History

 

 

Zoom Talk 2020-03-19 – Golden Age of Canal Street

Zoom Talk 2020-03-19 – Golden Age of Canal Street

Zoom Talk 2020-03-19

Zoom Talk 2020-03-19

https://www.dropbox.com/s/e0mrfn3mftjm4dz/zoom_0.mp4?dl=0

I’ve presented this talk to several groups in the last year or so. With everyone holed up because of Covid-19, I did the talk yesterday (19-March) via Zoom. It’s a bit long, because I was sorting out the use of Zoom, so you’ll need to fast-forward through the first 20 minutes of the talk to get to its actual beginning.

Also, TIL: it’s too long for YouTube. I’ll edit out that first portion and get it up there over the weekend. If you’d like to view it now, the link will let you download the MP4 version.

Enjoy!

 

Cemetery Scene with Railroad Tracks

Cemetery Scene with Railroad Tracks

Cemetery scene with railroad tracks along I-10. (cross-posted to Pontchartrain Railroad – N Scale)

cemetery scene

“Cemetery Scene” by Jeffrey H. Goldman, 1985 (via HNOC)

Cemetery Scene

Local architect and artist Jeffrey H. Goldman painted this “Cemetery Scene” in 1985. It depicts a cemetery from the other side of a single railroad track. This painting and several others by Mr. Goldman are now held by the Historic New Orleans Collection.

Rabbit holes

I try to post three or four images of old New Orleans daily to social media. It’s a great way to promote my books. The process of choosing those photos is rarely simple. While it’s easy to find images and tie them to themes in my books, I end up going down rabbit holes. For example, I may find a great image of the Lakefront, then see another with details that merit further research. Then I look at other images related to that one, and down and down I go. It’s fun, even though it can be time consuming.

Finding this Goldman painting is typical. I sought Boyd Cruise paintings, since he did so many of buildings in the French Quarter. I expanded the search to include other artists, and Goldman came up.

The Cemetery

This “Cemetery Scene” is of Greenwood Cemetery, viewed from the other side of the New Orleans Terminal Company track running parallel to the cemetery. Greenwood opened in 1852. Its western side was on the east bank of the New Basin Canal. The trains ran between the cemetery and canal.

The Trains

Norfolk Southern Railroad owns the track. The ownership runs through the old New Orleans Terminal Company. Southern Railway acquired NOTC in the early 1900. Now, it’s all Norfolk Southern.

This particular track connected old Union Station with the “back belt” tracks that run from Metairie, out to New Orleans East. Now, it’s only used by passenger trains coming and going from Union Passenger Terminal. While several trains used the track prior to the Amtrak consolidation, now it’s only used by the Amtrak Crescent. The video above shows the Amtrak Crescent traveling the track shown in Goldman’s Cemetery Scene. It’s shot from the other side of I-10, for safety reasons.

This video is from a couple of days prior to the cemetery scene. It shows the Crescent after it’s switched onto the Back Belt and is heading out of town.

The Artist

Mr. Jeffrey H. Goldman was born on February 11, 1941. He was an architect, photographer, writer, and artist. He passed away on September 4, 2010.